Course Descriptions

Select entry year

ACSC-010 YearOne

The YearOne class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, leadership development, social responsibility and life skills awareness and application. YearOne is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build friendships and help them become an integral part of the campus community. ()
Credit 0 (Fall)


CIAS-SOFA-103 Film/Video Materials & Technology

This course provides an introductory overview of the basic engineering and scientific principles associated with motion picture technologies. Topics covered include imaging physics, photographic science, human vision and perception, image capture and display technologies (both analog and digital) and digital image processing. This course is taught using both mathematical and phenomenological presentation and prepares students to proceed with more in-depth investigation of these fields in subsequent imaging science and digital cinema courses. Accompanying laboratory exercises provide hands-on experience with the presented concepts. (Prerequisites: COS-MATH-181, COS-MATH-181A or COS-MATH-171 or permission of instructor)
Credit 3 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-111 Imaging Science Fundamentals

An exploration of the fundamentals of imaging science and the imaging systems of the past, present, and future. Imaging systems studied include the human visual system, consumer and entertainment applications (e.g., traditional and digital photography, television, digital television and HDTV, virtual reality); medical applications (e.g., X-ray, ultrasound, MRI); business/document applications (e.g., impact and non-impact printing, scanners, printers, fax machines, copiers) and systems used in remote sensing and astronomy (e.g., night-vision systems, ground- and satellite-based observatories). The laboratory component includes experiments related to the principles and theories discussed in the corresponding lecture. Laboratory experiments give students experience with many imaging systems and exposure to the underlying scientific principles. (Prerequisites: Competency in algebra)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-112 Astronomical Imaging Fundamentals

Familiarizes students with the goals and techniques of astronomical imaging. The broad nature of astronomical sources will be outlined, in terms of requirements on astronomical imaging systems. These requirements are then investigated in the context of the astronomical imaging chain. Imaging chains in the optical, X-ray, radio, and/or other wavelengths will be studied in detail. Laboratory assignments will range from construction and characterization of a hand-held telescope to analysis of astronomical images. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-111 or permission of instructor)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-180 Introduction to Computing and Control

This hand-on course is an introduction to computer programming, simple electronics, and the control of electronic devices using commercially available, single-board computers (Raspberry Pi). The student will be introduced to object-oriented programming using Python. Fundamentals of flow control, object types and creation, input/output, and problem-solving approaches such as the use of randomness, divide-and-conquer, Monte Carlo, and search will be examined in detail and applied to imaging-related problems. In addition, emphasis will be placed on utilizing the analog and digital input/output ports available on these single-board computers to control and acquire data from electronic devices like optical detectors, LED sources, and servo motors. Emphasis will be placed on the use of open-source software libraries to assist in the control and the real-time acquisition of image data from peripheral imaging devices. (Prerequisites: Matriculation as Imaging Science or Motion Picture Science or permission of instructor)
Credit 3 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-181 Innovative Freshman Experience I

Freshman Imaging Project I is the first of a two-course sequence built around a single project aimed at designing, developing, and building a functional imaging system through a unified team effort. The system chosen as the focus of this development effort will be one which is relevant to a "real world" external constituency and necessary for that group to achieve its technical goals. With the help of faculty and staff from the imaging science program and other departments across campus, students will plan and organize the effort, conduct trade studies to assess technology options, integrate components to build their system, and confirm that the system meets desired levels of performance. Along the way the students will develop a general understanding of the foundational concepts of imaging science, an in-depth knowledge of at least one aspect of imaging science, a working knowledge of the principles of systems engineering, an appreciation for the value of teamwork in technical disciplines, and proficiency in oral and written technical communication. In this first course of the sequence, students will develop their system to a "preliminary design review" level of maturity, and will plan the trade-off studies needed to proceed with construction and testing of their system in the second course in the sequence. (Prerequisites: First-year status as Imaging Science or Motion Picture Science or permission of instructor)
Credit 3 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-182 Innovative Freshman Experience II

Freshman Imaging Project II is the second of a two-course sequence built around a single project aimed at designing, developing, and building a functional imaging system through a unified team effort. The system chosen as the focus of this development effort will be one which is relevant to a "real world" external constituency and necessary for that group to achieve its technical goals. With the help of faculty and staff from the imaging science program and other departments across campus, students will plan and organize the effort, conduct trade studies to assess technology options, integrate components to build their system, and confirm that the system meets desired levels of performance. Along the way the students will develop a general understanding of the foundational concepts of imaging science, an in-depth knowledge of at least one aspect of imaging science, a working knowledge of the principles of systems engineering, an appreciation for the value of teamwork in technical disciplines, and proficiency in oral and written technical communication. In this second course of the sequence, students will conduct trade-off studies to determine which of the competing technologies should be incorporated into their system, develop interface control documents to facilitate integration of those technologies, conduct a "critical design review" for an external review board, then build their system and demonstrate the resulting level of performance. (Prerequisites: First-year status as Imaging Science or Motion Picture Science or permission of instructor)
Credit 3 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-211 Probability & Statistics for Imaging

This course is an introduction to probability and statistics. The first half of the course will cover probability distributions for discrete and continuous random variables, expectation, variance, and joint distributions. The second half of the course will cover point estimation, statistical intervals, hypothesis testing, inference, and linear regression. (Prerequisites: COS-MATH-182 or COS-MATH-173 or equivalent)
Credit 3 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-221 Vision and Psychophysics

The final "component" in many imaging systems is visual perception. The human visual system can also be considered as an imaging system itself; arguably the most complex system. From visual optics through high-level cortical processing such as the perception of depth and motion, an understanding of the characteristics and limitations of the visual system aids in designing and evaluating imaging systems. Unlike other elements of imaging systems, it is difficult or impossible to get objective measures of visual perception; psychophysics provides tools for measuring perceptual mechanisms. This course presents an overview of the organization and function of the human visual system and some of the psychophysical techniques used to study visual perception. (Prerequisites: CIAS-SOFA-103 or permission of instructor)
Credit 3 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-241 Earth System Dynamics

This course is a general elective offering that will expose students to earth systems dynamics, i.e., the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and terrestrial components, and their interactions at a global scale. The course also offers introductions to regional and local scale interactions, as well as societal impacts, e.g., science, engineering, policy, and economics. This course will provide students with the critical thinking skills to evaluate the underlying science of system components, how they fluctuate, interact via feedback loops, their carbon and energy dynamics, and what this means for society as a whole. Special focus will be given to remote sensing methods for assessing global system dynamics, including satellite image analysis. This offering will include theoretical background, guest lecturers, and class discussion centered on prominent topics, e.g., climate change and the science behind this. (Prerequisites: 2nd year standing (or above) or permission of instructor)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-242 Sustainability of Regional Ecosystems

In this course we investigate regional system dynamics in context terrestrial, atmospheric, and hydrological components, their interactions at various scales, and their impacts on a set of human (societal) endeavors. These endeavors include economic, engineering, and social activities. We develop case studies at the regional scale, e.g., fuel wood resources in Africa, and local scale, e.g., vineyard farming in upstate New York, and discuss how these systems impact our society. We assess peer-review literature to gain a better understanding of system dynamics and evaluate geospatial approaches, e.g., remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS), as tools with which to monitor these regional systems. To this end we give special focus to remote sensing methods for assessing the sustainability of human-ecosystems interactions, specifically in terms of our extraction of ecosystem services such as clean water, clean air, food, shelter, recreation, etc. The course will include theoretical background, guest lecturers, and current scientific readings. (Prerequisites: Honors or 2nd year standing (or above) or permission of instructor)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-251 Radiometry

This course introduces the concepts of quantitative measurement of electromagnetic energy. The basic radiometric and photometric terms are introduced using calculus based definitions. Governing equations for source propagation and sensor output are derived. Simple source concepts are reviewed and detector figures of merit are introduced and used in problem solving. The radiometric concepts are then applied to simple imaging systems so that a student could make quantitative measurements with imaging instruments. (Prerequisites: COS-MATH-182,COS-PHYS-212)
Credit 3 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-261 Linear and Fourier Methods for Imaging

This course uses the concepts of complex numbers and linear algebra for describing imaging systems in the spatial-frequency domain via the discrete and continuous Fourier transform. (Prerequisites: COS-MATH-182)
Credit 4 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-290 Introduction to Scientific Research

This course will expose a student who is in the early stages of their post-secondary education to the process of conducting scientific research in an established university research laboratory setting. The student will perform experiments, document results, present their findings, and work closely with a faculty mentor who will design the research to be conducted. It is anticipated that this may be the student's first exposure to the field in which they are conducting research and the importance of background research and literature review will be emphasized. (Prerequisites: Permission of instructor)
Credit 1


COS-IMGS-321 Geometric Optics

This course introduces the analysis and design of optical imaging systems based on the ray model of light. Topics include reflection, refraction, imaging with lenses, stops and pupils, prisms, magnification and optical system design using computer software. (Prerequisites: COS-PHYS-212)
Credit 3 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-322 Physical Optics

Light waves having both amplitude and phase will be described to provide a foundation for understanding key optical phenomena such as interference, diffraction, and propagation. Starting from Maxwell's equations the course advances to the topic of Fourier optics. (Prerequisites: COS-PHYS-212,COS-IMGS-261 or COS-PHYS-283,COS-PHYS-320 or equivalent)
Credit 3 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-341 Interactions Between Light & Matter

An introduction to the principles necessary to understand how light interacts with matter. Atomic physics as applied to simple atoms is reviewed. These concepts are extended to multielectron atoms and an understanding of their spectra. Molecular structure and spectra are covered in depth, including the principles of lasers. Statistical physics concepts are then introduced. Next, the structure of crystalline solids, their band structure and optical properties are studied. These concepts are then used to understand electronic devices, such as imaging detectors. (Prerequisites: COS-PHYS-213)
Credit 3 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-351 Color Science

This course presents an introduction to color perception, measurement, and reproduction in imaging systems. Building upon an understanding of the human visual system and psychophysics from COS-IMGS-221 and radiometric measurements and computations from COS-IMGS-251, this course explores in more detail the basis of color perception, applies those principles to the measurement of color stimuli, and then explores the applications of color science in imaging system evaluation, characterization, and modeling. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-221)
Credit 3 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-361 Image Processing and Computer Vision I

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of digital image processing. The student will be exposed to image capture and image formation methodologies, sampling and quantization concepts, statistical descriptors and enhancement techniques based upon the image histogram, point processing, neighborhood processing, and global processing techniques based upon kernel operations and discrete convolution as well as the frequency domain equivalents, treatment of noise, geometrical operations for scale and rotation, and grey-level resampling techniques. Emphasis is placed on applications and efficient algorithmic implementation using the student's programming language of choice. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-261,COS-IMGS-180 or equivalent programming experience)
Credit 3 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-362 Image Processing and Computer Vision II

This course is an introduction to the more advanced concepts of digital image processing. The student will be exposed to image reconstruction, noise sources and techniques for noise removal, information theory, image compression, video compression, wavelet transformations, frequency-domain based applications, morphological operations, and modern digital image watermarking and steganography algorithms. Emphasis is placed on applications and efficient algorithmic implementation using the student's computer programming language of choice, technical presentation, and technical writing. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-361)
Credit 3 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-431 Environmental Applications of Remote Sensing

This course offers an introduction to remote sensing systems and a selection of environmental applications of remote sensing. The basic properties of electromagnetic radiation, its interaction with the atmosphere and earth surfaces (e.g., vegetation, minerals, water, etc.), and the interpretation of these interactions are dealt with in the first half of the course. This is followed by a description of airborne and spaceborne, active and passive sensors that operate throughout the electromagnetic spectrum for detecting physical phenomena. Finally, an introduction is provided to pre-processing and analysis techniques that are useful for extracting information from such sensors. The Earth's atmospheric, hydrospheric and terrestrial processes are considered at local to regional scales. Application areas include monitoring vegetation health, measuring biomass (carbon sequestration), identifying cultural features, assessing water resources, and detecting pollution and natural hazards. (Prerequisites: College Physics II or permission of instructor)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-433 Remote Sensing Systems Engineering

This course develops knowledge and understanding of the design and analysis of optical remote sensing systems for Earth remote sensing. Building on general imaging fundamentals learned earlier in their program, students will learn domain specific tools and techniques for analyzing airborne and satellite sensor systems for the optical spectral imaging of Earth. Through a combination of classroom and laboratory experiences, students will learn about the propagation of photons and signals from the Sun through the formation of a digital image. The course will emphasize a linear systems modeling perspective and provide the students the background to understand, model, and predict remote sensing imaging system performance. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-251,COS-IMGS-441,COS-IMGS-471 or permission of instructor)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-441 Noise and System Modeling

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding and ability to model noise and random processes within the context of imaging systems. After a brief review of probability theory, the concept of image noise is introduced. Next, random processes are studied in both the spatial and spatial frequency domains stressing the autpcorrleation function and the power density spectrum. Then we demonstrate the application of random processes to the understanding of signal and noise transfer in multistage imaging systems. At the completion of the course the student should have the ability to model signal and noise transfer within a multistage imaging system. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-211,COS-IMGS-261)
Credit 3 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-451 Imaging Detectors

This course provides an overview of the underlying physical concepts, designs, and characteristics of detectors used to sense electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths ranging from as short as X-rays to as long as millimeter radiation. The basic physical concepts common to many standard detector arrays will be reviewed. Some specific examples of detectors to be discussed include photomultipliers, micro channel plates, hybridized infrared arrays, PIN detectors, and SIS mixers. The use of detectors in fields such as astronomy, high energy physics, medical imaging and digital imaging will be discussed. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-251,COS-IMGS-341 or equivalent)
Credit 3 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-461 Multiwavelength Astronomical Imaging

Multiwavelength Astronomical Imaging will survey multiwavelength astronomical observing techniques and instrumentation. Students will gain an understanding of how the telescopes, detectors, and instrumentation in the major ground based and space based observatories function and how to use them. Observatories to be studied include the Very Large Array, GBT, ALMA, Spitzer, HST, Gemini, JWST, and Chandra. Students will plan and carry out a multiwavelength archival program on a topic of their choice. (Prerequisites: COS-PHYS-213 (required), Intermediate Astronomy (recommended))
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-462 Multivariate Statistical Image Processing

This course discusses the digital image processing concepts and algorithms used for the analysis of hyperspectral, multispectral and multi-channel data in multiple imaging application areas. Concepts are covered at the theoretical and implementation level using current, popular commercial software packages and high-level programming languages to work examples, homework problems and programming assignments. The requisite multivariate statistics will be presented as part of this course as an extension of the univariate statistics that the students have previously been exposed to in the introductory statistics classes. Topics to be covered will include methods for supervised data classification, clustering algorithms and unsupervised classification, multispectral data transformations, data redundancy reduction techniques, derivation of non-spectral images features to aid in the classification process, and data fusion for resolution enhancement. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-362)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-475 Advanced Imaging Laboratory I

Advanced Imaging Laboratory I is a companion laboratory sequence to the Imaging Systems Analysis I course. Empirical measurements of 1D (point) and 2D (plane) imaging systems are used to build computational models of tone-transfer function (TTF), point-spread function (PSF), and modulation-transfer function (MTF) of several systems. Significant programming and writing assignments are included. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-261)
Credit 2 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-476 Advanced Imaging Laboratory II

Advanced Imaging Laboratory II is a companion laboratory sequence to the Imaging Systems Analysis II course. Empirical measurements of 3D (e.g., stereoscopic, volumetric, time-sequential, hyperspectral) and 3+D (e.g., time-sequential hyperspectral) imaging systems are used to build computational models of imaging systems. Significant programming and writing assignments are included. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-475)
Credit 2 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-490 Undergraduate Research

This course will actively engage a student in the process of conducting scientific research in an established university research laboratory setting. The student will work with a research team (with at least the sponsoring faculty/mentor) and will perform experiments, document results, present their findings, and work closely with the faculty mentor. The interaction will allow the student to develop approaches to solving the particular problem based on their experience and though detailed technical discussions/presentations to the members of the research team. The team will critically review both the results of the experimental work and the student's proposed plans as well as offer suggestions concerning other options for future work. It is anticipated that the student will have a firm scientific foundation in imaging science and that domain-specific knowledge for the course will be gained though review of the literature. (Prerequisites: Permission of instructor)
Credit 4


COS-IMGS-502 Imaging Science Senior Project I

Students perform the independent research project defined in COS-IMGS-501 under the direction of a faculty member in imaging science. The student presents the results of the project to a public meeting. (Prerequisites: Permission of instructor)
Credit 3 (Fall)


COS-IMGS-503 Imaging Science Senior Project II

Students perform the independent research project defined in COS-IMGS-501 under the direction of a faculty member in imaging science. The student presents the results of the project to a public meeting. (Prerequisites: Permission of instructor)
Credit 3 (Spring)


COS-IMGS-528 Design and Fabrication of a Solid State Camera

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with hands-on experience in building a CCD camera. The course provides the basics of CCD operation including an overview, CCD clocking, analog output circuitry, cooling, and evaluation criteria. (Prerequisites: Fourth year or graduate status in Imaging Science or by permission of instructor)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-532 Advanced Environmental Applications of Remote Sensing

This course will focus on a broader selection of analytical techniques with an application- centric presentation. These techniques include narrow-band indices, filtering in the spatial and frequency domains, principal component analysis, textural analysis, hybrid and object-oriented classifiers, change detection methods, and structural analysis. All of these techniques are applied to assessment of natural resources. Sensing modalities include imaging spectroscopy (hyperspectral), multispectral, and light detection and ranging (lidar) sensors. Applications such as vegetation stress assessment, foliar biochemistry, advanced image classification for land use purposes, detecting change between image scenes, and assessing topography and structure in forestry and grassland ecosystems (volume, biomass, biodiversity) and built environments will be examined. Real-world remote sensing and field data from international, US, and local sources are used throughout this course. (Prerequisites: COS-IMGS-431, COS-PHYS-112 or permission of instructor)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-539 Principles of Solid State Imaging Arrays

This course covers the basics of solid state physics, electrical engineering, linear systems and imaging needed to understand modern focal plane array design and use. The course emphasizes knowledge of the working of CMOS and infrared arrays. (Prerequisites: Fourth year or graduate status in Imaging Science or by permission of instructor)
Credit 3


COS-IMGS-542 Testing of Focal Plane Arrays

An introduction to the techniques used for the testing of solid state imaging detectors such as CCDs, CMOS and Infrared Arrays is provided. Focal plane array users in industry, government and university need to ensure that key operating parameters for such devices either fall within an operating range or that the limitation to the performance is understood. This is a hands-on course where the students will measure the performance parameters of a particular camera in detail. (Prerequisites: Fourth year or graduate status in Imaging Science or by permission of instructor)
Credit 3

Last Modified: 12:33pm 15 Feb 11