RIT researchers fix Landsat 8 imagery, measurements with ‘innovative’ algorithm Aaron Gerace and Matt Montanaro identified problem, developed correction
Faculty/Staff/DIRS

story photo

 

RIT alumni Aaron Gerace ’10 (imaging science), left, and Matt Montanaro ’05, ’09 (physics, imaging science) developed a data processing algorithm that mitigates the impact of stray light in the Landsat 8 thermal infrared sensor.

Nov. 16, 2016
Susan Gawlowicz

Rochester Institute of Technology researchers have solved a problem nagging NASA’s Landsat 8 Earth-sensing satellite.

Stray light in the thermal infrared sensor, or TIRS, reduces accurate temperature measurements of the Earth’s surface.

Software developed by Aaron Gerace and Matt Montanaro, senior scientists at RIT’s Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, improves the accuracy of the Landsat 8 data. NASA funded their research with an $86,000 grant.

NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey have approved the algorithm that will automatically process and correct Landsat 8 images and refine reprocessed data.

NASA’s Landsat program of Earth-orbiting satellites has monitored global changes to the landscape since 1972. Landsat satellites orbit the Earth’s poles and pass over the same spot every 16 days to study how the Earth changes over time.

“Matt and Aaron were the developers, tuners and testers of the algorithm and its parameters,” said Brian Markham, Landsat Calibration Scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. “The algorithm provides clear improvement in the image quality of the TIRS data and the ability to get accurate temperature measurements of Earth targets, such as lakes, particularly those surrounded by areas of different temperatures. This is important when you are trying to determine if targets are warming or cooling over time.”

The effects of stray light on Landsat 8’s thermal band measurements were detected shortly after the mission launched in February 2013. Defective optics in the thermal infrared sensor allow unwanted light to enter the optical system and disrupt accurate measurements. According to Gerace and Montanaro, errors have reached as high as 10 degrees Celsius in areas with extreme temperatures like Antarctic or desert regions. Mid-range surface temperatures more typical of the United States are less affected by these wide margins of error, they said.

“Everything you look at with Landsat 8 in the thermal infrared bands appears warmer than it should,” Gerace said. “By implementing this fix, people can do accurate science because the temperatures coming from whatever they’re looking at is correct now.”

A new method to remove the effects of the stray light in the data became a high priority when standard calibration techniques failed to accurately adjust the imagery.

Montanaro had worked for NASA Goddard on the Landsat 8 calibration and TIRS instrument teams. The malfunction was traced to a hardware defect in the telescope, he said. “You would have to replace the telescope to fix this problem.”

Gerace and Montanaro went beyond the quick fix of subtracting out the average error from the Landsat 8 imagery and developed a data processing algorithm to estimate the precise amount of extra light in each scene.

“The idea was that if you could determine from where the stray light is coming from and how much we’re seeing, then you can use that information as a satellite flies over the scene to determine the stray light,” Gerace said. “Our algorithm—adaptively per scene—figures out how much it should subtract to make the temperature accurate,” Gerace said.

Jim Irons, deputy director of the Earth Sciences Division and Landsat 8 project scientist at NASA Goddard, called Gerace and Montanaro’s solution “innovative.”

“They performed a great deal of data analysis to convince the Landsat Science Team, a tough crowd, that their algorithm significantly and consistently improved the accuracy of TIRS data products,” Irons said.

The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center in Sioux Falls, S.D., will begin using the software correction in its operational processing of Landsat 8 data in late 2016, Irons said.

The software correction anticipates a concern surrounding the future Landsat 9, slated to launch in 2020.

Montanaro will support the Thermal Infrared Sensor 2 for Landsat 9. “From headquarters to technical people, the No. 1 thing is, how do we prevent stray light from Landsat 9?”

NASA is implementing a hardware fix to the telescope for TIRS-2 before the launch, he noted.

A scientific paper validating Gerace and Montanaro’s stray light correction for the Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor is currently under review.

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RIT researchers fix Landsat 8 imagery, measurements with ‘innovative’ algorithm
research
Remote Sensing

Aaron Gerace and Matt Montanaro identified problem, developed correction

Nov. 16, 2016
Susan Gawlowicz

201611/geraceandmontanaro.jpg

RIT alumni Aaron Gerace ’10 (imaging science), left, and Matt Montanaro ’05, ’09 (physics, imaging science) developed a data processing algorithm that mitigates the impact of stray light in the Landsat 8 thermal infrared sensor.

Rochester Institute of Technology researchers have solved a problem nagging NASA’s Landsat 8 Earth-sensing satellite.

Stray light in the thermal infrared sensor, or TIRS, reduces accurate temperature measurements of the Earth’s surface.

Software developed by Aaron Gerace and Matt Montanaro, senior scientists at RIT’s Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, improves the accuracy of the Landsat 8 data. NASA funded their research with an $86,000 grant.

NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey have approved the algorithm that will automatically process and correct Landsat 8 images and refine reprocessed data.

NASA’s Landsat program of Earth-orbiting satellites has monitored global changes to the landscape since 1972. Landsat satellites orbit the Earth’s poles and pass over the same spot every 16 days to study how the Earth changes over time.

“Matt and Aaron were the developers, tuners and testers of the algorithm and its parameters,” said Brian Markham, Landsat Calibration Scientist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. “The algorithm provides clear improvement in the image quality of the TIRS data and the ability to get accurate temperature measurements of Earth targets, such as lakes, particularly those surrounded by areas of different temperatures. This is important when you are trying to determine if targets are warming or cooling over time.”

The effects of stray light on Landsat 8’s thermal band measurements were detected shortly after the mission launched in February 2013. Defective optics in the thermal infrared sensor allow unwanted light to enter the optical system and disrupt accurate measurements. According to Gerace and Montanaro, errors have reached as high as 10 degrees Celsius in areas with extreme temperatures like Antarctic or desert regions. Mid-range surface temperatures more typical of the United States are less affected by these wide margins of error, they said.

“Everything you look at with Landsat 8 in the thermal infrared bands appears warmer than it should,” Gerace said. “By implementing this fix, people can do accurate science because the temperatures coming from whatever they’re looking at is correct now.”

A new method to remove the effects of the stray light in the data became a high priority when standard calibration techniques failed to accurately adjust the imagery.

Montanaro had worked for NASA Goddard on the Landsat 8 calibration and TIRS instrument teams. The malfunction was traced to a hardware defect in the telescope, he said. “You would have to replace the telescope to fix this problem.”

Gerace and Montanaro went beyond the quick fix of subtracting out the average error from the Landsat 8 imagery and developed a data processing algorithm to estimate the precise amount of extra light in each scene.

“The idea was that if you could determine from where the stray light is coming from and how much we’re seeing, then you can use that information as a satellite flies over the scene to determine the stray light,” Gerace said. “Our algorithm—adaptively per scene—figures out how much it should subtract to make the temperature accurate,” Gerace said.

Jim Irons, deputy director of the Earth Sciences Division and Landsat 8 project scientist at NASA Goddard, called Gerace and Montanaro’s solution “innovative.”

“They performed a great deal of data analysis to convince the Landsat Science Team, a tough crowd, that their algorithm significantly and consistently improved the accuracy of TIRS data products,” Irons said.

The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center in Sioux Falls, S.D., will begin using the software correction in its operational processing of Landsat 8 data in late 2016, Irons said.

The software correction anticipates a concern surrounding the future Landsat 9, slated to launch in 2020.

Montanaro will support the Thermal Infrared Sensor 2 for Landsat 9. “From headquarters to technical people, the No. 1 thing is, how do we prevent stray light from Landsat 9?”

NASA is implementing a hardware fix to the telescope for TIRS-2 before the launch, he noted.

A scientific paper validating Gerace and Montanaro’s stray light correction for the Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor is currently under review.

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Original Source: University News

RIT professor images David Livingstone diaries, gives talks in UK
research
Cultural Artifact and Document Imaging

Roger Easton contributes to Livingstone Spectral Imaging team

Nov. 9, 2016
Susan Gawlowicz

201611/livingstone.jpg

RIT professor Roger Easton digitally recovered content from the 19th century journals kept by British explorer David Livingstone. The images above show pages from Livingstone’s 1871 diary before (left) and after spectral imaging processing.

Multispectral imaging technology continues to recover new insights from the field diaries of 19th-century explorer David Livingstone. A team of scholars and scientists who worked on the Livingstone Spectral Imaging project will present their research in public talks in the United Kingdom in November.

While stranded in Central Africa, Livingstone composed letters, diaries, maps and sketches on scraps of paper using inks made from local berries. His writings and drawings document the Central African slave trade, social dynamics among local populations and geographical information.

“Because of the poor quality of the ink, the works probably had only been read by Livingstone himself,” said Roger Easton, professor in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science at Rochester Institute of Technology, who imaged the Livingstone documents.

Easton is a member of a team of scholars and scientists, led by Adrian Wisnicki, assistant professor of English at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, and Megan Ward, assistant professor at Oregon State University, that has assembled a digitally processed archived dedicated to the explorer. Livingstone Online: Illuminating Imperial Exploration archives more than 7,500 digital documents of original material.

To make Livingstone’s writings readable, advanced spectral imaging and analysis was conducted by a team that included Easton and Keith Knox, retired scientist from the U.S. Air Force Research Labs.

The team of four scholars and scientists will present the results of the David Livingstone Spectral Imaging project—including both the technical aspects of the imaging and the results of the scholarly studies—in talks at the University of Edinburgh on Nov. 14, the University of Oxford on Nov. 16 and Queen’s University in Belfast on Nov. 18.

For more information, contact Roger Easton at easton@cis.rit.edu.

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Original Source: University News

Owasco Lake's blue-green algae visible from space; satellite helps with monitoring efforts
Remote Sensing

Nov. 10, 2016
Gwendolyn Craig

Owasco Lake from space

The NASA satellite Landsat 8 captures an algal bloom, faintly visible in light green waves across Owasco Lake on Sept. 21.

Cold weather has brought some relief as water tests for the city of Auburn and town of Owasco continue to return with no detectable levels of blue-green algae toxins. The public water supply, which serves approximately 45,000 Cayuga County residents, has not shown levels of microcystin, the toxin that can be produced by harmful algal blooms, since Oct. 10.

The Cayuga County Health Department has spent weeks testing both the raw and treated drinking water, sending samples to the state Department of Health's laboratory in Albany. But while staff there were testing the water in the treatment plants, watershed groups were out on Owasco Lake itself, watching for the blooms.

Bob Brower, president of the Owasco Watershed Lake Association, said once per week about 40 volunteers scoured the shoreline of the lake, which has been mapped into 24 inspection zones. With the guidance and expertise of the Owasco Lake Watershed Inspection Program, volunteers are trained to identify blooms and report them. 

While this part of the surveillance program has been effective for finding and reporting shoreline blooms, Brower has started to develop what he's at times referred to as the association's own navy — combining satellite imagery, drones, data collecting buoys and on-the-ground searches for a more comprehensive view of what's going on in Owasco Lake.

Partnering with Rochester Institute of Technology's Center for Imaging Science, one day this summer all the components aligned. On Sept. 21, a NASA satellite called Landsat 8 flew overhead. A volunteer with a drone donated his equipment and time, and with the cloudless skies observers were able to capture video footage and satellite imagery of the green streaks stretching across the northern and central portion of the lake. It was something volunteers would not have been able to see from their shoreline vantage points. 

"We were both elated, because we had this marvelous good fortune to have the drones and satellite deployable at the same time to have a bloom occurring, and to have it in conjunction with an oversight, which comes every 16 days," Brower said. "And then, completely bummed by the bloom itself. It's one of those moments in life where you're really happy and really unhappy."

Little did Brower know, one day later the town of Owasco's treated drinking water would first show detectable levels of toxins.

Anthony Vodacek, a professor of Imaging Science at RIT, said Landsat 8 is part of a number of satellite sensors launched since 1972. The sensors have improved over time, and while traditionally they've been beneficial for looking at oceans, he said Landsat 8 has been able to photograph on a much smaller scale. Photography from an older sensor, for example, can take a photo where one pixel is the equivalent of 1 kilometer.

"Obviously useless for Owasco Lake," Vodacek said.

But Landsat 8 has been able to narrow that down, with one pixel equaling about 30 meters. 

"That has really been unprecedented to have the sensitivity of the system," Vodacek added.

Nina Raqueno, a research staff member with RIT's Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory, has collected samples on the lake this summer with PhD candidate Ryan Ford. Ford's project at RIT is exploring how to use Landsat imagery for scientific applications, and more specifically how to use it to identify blue-green algae.

Raqueno said while the satellite view is helpful for determining where the blooms are, the blooms have been known to occur below the surface, and that the satellite cannot detect. Brower said the blooms have been spotted as deep as 60 feet in the lake.

Three buoys stationed in the lake, too, collect data on the water such as temperature, PH, oxygen, and other characteristics. It's helpful, Brower explained at an OWLA meeting in October, to see what the conditions of the lake are during a harmful algal bloom, and may help provide clues as to what is causing so many to pop up during the late summer months.

Andrew Snell and Tim Schneider, who run the inspection program, also drive around the lake, monitoring certain sites. When a bloom is reported, depending on its intensity, they'll collect a sample and send it to a laboratory to test its toxicity. Working with the state Department of Environmental Conservation, if a bloom is discovered to be toxic, the public is notified on a Harmful Algal Blooms Notification Page. That page is updated every Friday between May and October with the extent of the bloom and whether toxins are present.

Schneider said last year's blooms were more extensive, but this year's blooms appear to be more concentrated in coves with higher toxin levels. They've observed most of the blooms in the northern third of the lake, with some localized shoreline blooms at the southern end. 

Now with winter on its way, the surveillance program has come to a close. Schneider said he'll still head to the lake shores now and then just to check on things, but he's not expecting any more large blooms this year. 

Meanwhile OWLA and others are planning for next year, and Brower hopes that will include more drone work. Raqueno and Ford hope they can incorporate their own drones, which they said can use different filters to detect whether an algae bloom is just algae, or blue-green algae based on the light wave lengths it emits. 

The study and monitoring is a small piece of the $600,000 state grant OWLA received, with about $6,581 going to the Owasco Watershed Inspection Program. Still, Brower is hoping to bolster the program.

"These (harmful algal blooms) are not just near-shore phenomenon," he said. "Our sampling team, which has been doing this every week, can't see the deep sections. The satellite imagery can't see the sidelines as well, so it's a nice correlation."

For more information on the inspection program, visit owascoinspection.org.

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Original Source: The Citizen

Student Newsmakers
Faculty/Staff

Lauren Taylor, Ph.D. student in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science from Marlton, N.J., and Jie Qiao, associate professor in the Center for Imaging Science, presented “Determining Optimized Laser Parameters for Non-Thermal Femtosecond Laser Processing of Silicon” at the Frontiers in Optics: The 100th Optical Society of America Annual Meeting in Rochester on Oct. 18.


Alexandra Artusio-Glimpse, a Ph.D. student in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science from Phoenix, was offered a National Research Council Postdoctoral Associateship to work at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. She will begin the three-year fellowship in September.

Nov. 9, 2016

Taylor Wolf, a fourth-year biochemistry major from Norwich, N.Y., presented a poster and a talk on “Drug Quality Assurance for Tuberculosis Medication,” at the National Undergraduate Research Symposium at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on July 15-16. She seeks to develop a test to detect substandard and counterfeit tuberculosis medications.


Claire Finnerty, a second-year biomedical sciences and public policy major, and Tayler Ruggero, a second-year criminal justice and public policy major, were awarded a Diplomacy Summit Scholarship from Rochester Global Connections to attend the U.S. Department of State’s regional summit, Women’s Empowerment: Keys to Leadership, June 1 in Albany, based on work at a study abroad in Rwanda.


Noreen Gallagher, a graduate student in environmental science, presented her paper, “Isolation of Bacteria from Lake Waters Associated with Wastewater Effluents Capable of Degrading Various Pharmaceuticals,” at the International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology in Houston from June 4-11.


Adam Kaufman, a fourth-year game design and development major, was selected for the Henry Clay Center for Statesmanship College Student Congress. The week-long program, in Lexington, Ky., brings students together with lawmakers to discuss the importance of applying the art of compromise to their work.


Elizabeth Grese, a second-year international hospitality and service management student, received the Pedro Cruz Scholarship ($1,000) from the Rural & Migrant Ministry in recognition of her leadership and contributions to Colleges Against Cancer and volunteer work with Rochester’s Hope Lodge.


Mario Saucedo-Espinosa, a microsystems doctoral student, received the 2016 Tomas Hirschfeld Scholar award, given by the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Society in recognition of a Best Paper based on his work in microfluidics.


Nicholas Nenni, a master’s student in sustainable engineering, presented his paper, “Life-cycle and Economic Analysis of End-of-Life Strategies for Spent Coffee Grounds,” at the Industrial and Systems Engineering Research conference in Anaheim, Calif., May 21-24.


Kevin Cooke, a Ph.D. candidate in the astrophysical sciences and technology program, won sponsorship from the American Astronomical Society to attend the Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering workshop in Washington D.C., April 17-20. He learned about the federal science funding process and met with the science policy advisors for Sens. Booker, Menendez and Schumer.


Elizabeth Bondi ’16 (imaging science) won the Best Paper Award and $1,000 for “Calibration of Unmanned Aerial Systems imagery inside and outside of shadows for improved vegetation index computation” at the SPIE Commercial and Scientific Sensing and Imaging conference in Baltimore April 17-21.

Raj Rengarajan, a Ph.D. candidate in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, presented “Modeling of forest canopy BRDF using DIRSIG” at the SPIE Commercial and Scientific Sensing and Imaging conference in Baltimore on April 21.

Lei Fan, a Ph.D. candidate in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, presented “Tensor subspace analysis for spatial-spectral classification of Hyperspectral data” at the SPIE Commercial and Scientific Sensing and Imaging conference in Baltimore April 17-21.


Shagan Sah, a Ph.D. student in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, won Best Student Poster for his research on “Graph Theoretic Approach to Convolution Neural Networks” at the 2016 IEEE Rochester Joint Chapters Meeting April 19.


Natalia Dempsey, a third-year criminal justice and public policy major from Syracuse, N.Y., won a certificate of achievement for a research paper from the New York State Assembly, where she completed a 10-week internship on May 11.


Smith Agyingi, a fourth-year biomedical sciences major from Rochester, presented a poster on “Susceptibility to Sickle Cell Co-Morbidities is Regulated by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the TOLLIP Gene” at the Experimental Biology Conference in San Diego April 2-6.


Cody Cummings and Christine Kim, chemistry students at RIT/NTID, won the best analytical chemistry research award in April at the American Chemical Society’s Research Symposium, Rochester section, for the research they conducted with faculty David Meiggs, Morgan Bida and Todd Pagano.


Hailie King, Adam Pirro, Sondus Bellow and Zachary Trombley, all hospitality and tourism management students, were selected for the prestigious Marriott Voyage global leadership development program in April to train the next generation of hospitality and service professionals.


Kristina Punzi, a Ph.D. student in the astrophysical sciences and technology program, participated in a Congressional Visits Day sponsored by the American Astronomical Society in Washington, D.C., on March 16.


Preethi Vaidyanathan, Ph.D. student in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, won best paper for “Fusing Eye Movements and Observer Narratives for Expert-Driven Image-Region Annotations” at the Symposium on Eye Tracking Research and Applications in Charleston, S.C., March 14-17.


Saddam “Sam” Alrobaie, Fatima Zara and Kim Callahan, third-year biotechnology majors, presented a poster on “Spent Coffee Grounds as a Viable Feedstock for Biofuels Production and Usable Byproducts” at the National Conference for McNairs Scholars and Undergraduate Research at the University of Maryland on March 10-13. They are research students in RIT professor Jeff Lodge’s biotech lab in the Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences. Alrobaie and Zara are McNair Scholars.


Claire Ryan, a fourth-year psychology major from Glenview, Ill., presented a poster on health literacy and deaf college students at the Student Research Forum of the National Conference in Health Disparities in Washington, D.C., on March 1.


Emily Berkson and Tim Gibbs, graduate students in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, presented a poster on “Statistical Distribution of Spectral Anomalies in Varied Scene Content” and “NEFDS Contamination Model Parameter Estimation of Powder Contaminated Surfaces,” respectively, at the Conference on Data Analysis hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory in Santa Fe, N.M., March 2-4.


Jacqueline McGraw, a fourth-year game design and development student, has been chosen as a 2016 International Game Developers Association (IGDA) Foundation Women in Games Ambassador. As part of the program, she received an all-access pass to the Game Developers Conference March 14–18 in San Francisco.


Three members of Tiger Tales Toastmasters won during the Toastmasters Area 22 Club Contests on Feb. 20. Alex Turner won the first place and Abdul Saboor Mobariz won second place in the International Speeches Contest. Corey Wilson won first place in the Table Topics Contest.


Mike Terzo Jr., a third-year environmental sustainability, health and safety major, received the Howard Freckleton and Roy Hamel Endowed Scholarship Award from RIT Ambulance for being active in the fire department and EMS service in the community. He has been an active member in the Rush, N.Y., Fire District since 2006 and was named captain in January.


Computer science students Gregory Goh, Victoria Sardelli, Matthew Ku and Orens Xhagolli took third place at HackBU, a hackathon hosted Feb. 13–14 at Binghamton University. Their project, Chalk, is a smart schedule maker.


Heather Williams, a second-year Motion Picture Science major from Watertown, N.Y., won second place in Rumba, first place in Swing and third place overall in Newcomer Rhythm at the Cornell Classic Dancesport Competition on Oct. 17. She is a member of the RIT Ballroom Dance Club.


Fulbright Scholars from RIT and the University at Buffalo met in Watkins Glen State Park on Oct. 4 for a social event to bring scholars from different universities together. The event was organized by RIT Fulbright Scholars Association club with help from International Student Services in collaboration with the Fulbright Young Professionals Network - Western New York/North Western Pennsylvania Chapter.


Quintina Frink, a fourth-year chemical engineering student, won the 2015 Susan L. Costa Memorial Scholarship, given to students for academic achievements and campus leadership. Frink is parliamentarian for NTID’s Student Assembly, serves in the Hands of Fire ministry and as RA at the university. She is from Arlington, Ohio.


Thomas Close, undergraduate student, chemical engineering, Gaurav Tulsyan, graduate student, materials science, and Christiaan Richter, assistant professor, chemical engineering, co-authored “Reversible oxygen scavenging at room temperature using electrochemically-reduced titanium oxide nanotubes” in Nature Nanotechnology.


Chaitanya Mahajan, engineering doctoral student, received the Industrial and Systems Engineering Research Conference/Manufacturing & Design Div. 2015 Student Best Paper Award for “3D printing of carbon fiber composites with preferentially aligned fibers.”


Alvaro Rojas, industrial engineering and imaging science doctoral student, won the 2015 Imaging Science & Technology association’s Itek Award for his paper, “Exploring surface defects on EP-based 3D-printed structures.” It will be published in the Journal of Imaging Science & Technology.


Derek Kreider and Jacob Klaus, industrial and systems engineering students, placed second in the Simio Student Simulation Competition 2015, hosted by the IIE Annual Conference in June. Their entry on shipping container order, delivery and management was among 70 collegiate design entries.


Engineering students Geni Giannotti, Megan Ehrhart, Noah Schadt, Tyler Leichtenberger, Jared Green and Adam Podolec won second place for their project, Soft Ankle-Foot Orthotic, in the undergraduate design competition at the Summer Biomechanics, Bioengineering and Bio-transport Conference in June.


Chantel Charlebois, a third-year biomedical engineering student, won the Rochester Engineering Society's Keith W. Amish Memorial Scholarship, for $1,000, given to recognize academic excellence in a developing technology or energy-efficiency related fields and campus leadership. She is from Jericho, Vt.


Melissa Mendoza, a third-year biomedical engineering student from Hollis, N.Y., had a research article, “It’s a non-dialysis day—Do you know how your patient is doing? A case for research into inter-dialytic activity,” published in the international journal Blood Purification.


Annette Tavernese, a graduate student in secondary education of students who are deaf or hard of hearing, won first place in the graduate student oral presentation category at the Emerging Researchers National Conference in STEM in Washington, D.C. Tavernese is from Brick, N.J.


Joey Bingham, a business major from Franklinville, N.J., and Tyler DeVore, a biomedical engineering major from Boonton Township, N.J., were members of the ice hockey team that participated in the 18th Winter Deaflympics in Russia, March 28–April 5.


Kathleen Tigue, a fourth-year game design and development major, and Jackie Wiley, a third-year game design and development major, were two of 20 women to win Microsoft’s “Are You A Game Changer?” contest. They each received an all-access pass to the Game Developers Conference, March 2–6 in San Francisco, and a VIP ticket to Xbox’s Women in Gaming Awards Luncheon at the conference.


Katie Pustolski, a fourth-year game design and development major, was selected as a 2015 International Game Developers Association Foundation (IDGAF) Intel Scholar and will receive an all-access pass to the Game Developers Conference, March 2–6 in San Francisco.


Jonathan Bowman, a fourth-year game design and development major, was a Gold Winner in the Game Narrative Summit’s 2015 Student Narrative Analysis Competition and will receive an expo pass to the Game Developers Conference, March 2–6 in San Francisco.


Jackie Bergin, a third-year advertising and public relations student, received the Charles S. Smith Scholarship from the Rochester chapter of the Public Relations Society of America. The scholarship helps students attend public relations conferences. RIT students have earned seven of the last eight Smith scholarships.


Victoria K. McGowen, a third-year motion picture science student, and Matthew Ross Donato, a fourth-year motion picture science student, received the Louis F. Wolf Jr. Memorial Scholarship at the annual Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers conference in Los Angeles. The scholarship is designed to help students studying in motion pictures and television, with an emphasis on technology.


JD Harper, a Master of Architecture student, was named recipient of the American Institute of Architects New York State Student Award for notable contributions and accomplishments by a student member of the American Institute of Architecture Students. There are more than 4,500 architecture students in New York state.


A cappella group Eight Beat Measure received a place on the Varsity Vocals Best of Collegiate A Cappella 2015 album with their recording of “Talk Dirty,” originally performed by Jason Derulo. Download the song for free.


Jie Yang, a Ph.D. student in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, won the Best Remote Sensing Paper for “A Combined Approach for Ice Sheet Elevation Extraction from Lidar Point Clouds,” co-written with John Kerekes, professor in the Center for Imaging Science, at the IEEE Western New York Image Processing Workshop held at RIT on Nov. 7. Yang is a resident of Suizhou City, Hubei Province, China.


Selene Chew, third-year computational mathematics major in the College of Science, won the overall Best Paper Award for “Normalized Cuts with Soft Must-Link Constraints for Image Segmentation and Clustering,” co-written with Nathan Cahill, associate professor in the School of Mathematical Sciences, at the IEEE Western New York Image Processing Workshop held at RIT on Nov. 7. Chew is a resident of Ithaca, N.Y.


Chelsea Wiedman, a fourth-year biochemistry student, and Matt Loiacono, a fourth-year student in applied mathematics and networking and system administration, were recognized at Tutor Con, hosted at RIT on Oct. 4. They are active participants in the College of Science Learning Assistant Program.


Alexander Triassi and Matthew Wheatley, fourth-year biotechnology majors and lead authors, published “L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL): a putative target for the development of narrow spectrum antibacterial compounds,” in the Sept. 26 issue of Frontiers in Microbiology with Michael Savka and André Hudson, professors in RIT’s Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences; alumnus Han Ming Gan, Monash University Malaysia; and Renwick Dobson, University of Canterbury, New Zealand.


Megan Bernilla, an international studies major at NTID, taught English at Jorge Otte School for the Deaf in Santiago, Chile, for a co-op July 29 through Aug. 22.


Franly Ulerio Nunez, a laboratory science technology major at NTID, presented “Fingerprinting the Biochemical Make-Up of Fruits Available to Migratory Birds via Multidimensional Fluorescence and Chemometrics” at the 2014 national meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco on Aug. 11.


Tia Canonico, a fourth-year illustration major; Sally-Rose Craigin, a fourth-year ASL-English interpretation major; Katie Bonfiglio, a fourth-year ASL-English interpretation major; and Kristen Cummings ’13 (psychology) were awarded scholarships by the Alpha Xi Delta Foundation.

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RIT professor wins Smithsonian, Carnegie and SAI fellowships
faculty
research
Astronomy and Space Science

Joel Kastner studies young stars and planets

Nov. 4, 2016
Susan Gawlowicz

story photo

RIT professor Joel Kastner is the Study Abroad International Faculty Fellow at the Arcetri Observatory in Florence, Italy.

Rochester Institute of Technology professor Joel Kastner is broadening and deepening his research program on the origins of our solar system and planetary systems orbiting other stars while on four consecutive fellowships and visiting positions during his sabbatical this academic year.

Kastner, professor in RIT’s Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science and the School of Physics and Astronomy, is the Study Abroad International Faculty Fellow for the month of November at the Arcetri Observatory in Florence, Italy. He is collaborating with former RIT postdoctoral fellow Germano Sacco and other Arcetri scientists to identify and study young stars within a few hundred light years of the sun using newly available data from the European Space Agency’s Gaia space telescope.

He was also awarded two additional fellowships for 2017—the prestigious Merle A. Tuve Fellowship from the Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Terrestrial Magnetism in Washington, D.C., for his six-week residency there, starting in January 2017; and a Smithsonian Institution Short Term Visitor fellowship for his residency at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., in March and April 2017.

Prior to his residency in Florence, Kastner spent two months as a visiting astronomer at the Institut de Planetologie et Astronomie de Grenoble, or IPAG, in France, studying the compositions of planet-forming disks around young stars in a collaboration with scientists there who work in the areas of interstellar and solar system chemistry.

“The astrophysicists at IPAG, Arcetri, Carnegie and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory are combining observations with the world’s most powerful astronomical facilities with sophisticated computer modeling to attack the complex problem of how planetary systems, including our own solar system, have come into being,” Kastner said. “I feel very fortunate to be able to work so closely with so many ‘black belt’ astrophysicists during one sabbatical year.”

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Original Source: University News

UAS Workshop Featured in Campus Spotlight
Undergraduate
Remote Sensing
research

Nov. 8, 2016
Jacob Kaucher

campus spotlight photo

Sadie Wolters, center, from Hilton, and Lindsay Martinescu, from Webster, fourth-year students in RIT’s Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, presented their research on detecting white mold in snap beans using spectral remote sensing and drones at the “Systems and Technologies for Remote Sensing Applications Through Unmanned Aerial Systems,” or STRATUS 2016, Workshop at RIT on Oct. 28. The workshop— sponsored by RIT’s Center for Imaging Science, IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, Pictometry and Headwall Photonics— brought together academics, industry representatives and domain specialists to share perspectives on UAS imaging. The UAS Center is an RIT signature research area.

Original Source: University News

RIT professor wins Smithsonian, Carnegie and SAI fellowships Joel Kastner studies young stars and planets
Faculty/Staff/AST

 

 

 

 

 

story photo

 

RIT professor Joel Kastner is the Study Abroad International Faculty Fellow at the Arcetri Observatory in Florence, Italy.

Nov. 8, 2016
Susan Gawlowicz

Rochester Institute of Technology professor Joel Kastner is broadening and deepening his research program on the origins of our solar system and planetary systems orbiting other stars while on four consecutive fellowships and visiting positions during his sabbatical this academic year.

Kastner, professor in RIT’s Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science and the School of Physics and Astronomy, is the Study Abroad International Faculty Fellow for the month of November at the Arcetri Observatory in Florence, Italy. He is collaborating with former RIT postdoctoral fellow Germano Sacco and other Arcetri scientists to identify and study young stars within a few hundred light years of the sun using newly available data from the European Space Agency’s Gaia space telescope.

He was also awarded two additional fellowships for 2017—the prestigious Merle A. Tuve Fellowship from the Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Terrestrial Magnetism in Washington, D.C., for his six-week residency there, starting in January 2017; and a Smithsonian Institution Short Term Visitor fellowship for his residency at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass., in March and April 2017.

Prior to his residency in Florence, Kastner spent two months as a visiting astronomer at the Institut de Planetologie et Astronomie de Grenoble, or IPAG, in France, studying the compositions of planet-forming disks around young stars in a collaboration with scientists there who work in the areas of interstellar and solar system chemistry.

“The astrophysicists at IPAG, Arcetri, Carnegie and the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory are combining observations with the world’s most powerful astronomical facilities with sophisticated computer modeling to attack the complex problem of how planetary systems, including our own solar system, have come into being,” Kastner said. “I feel very fortunate to be able to work so closely with so many ‘black belt’ astrophysicists during one sabbatical year.”

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Campus Spotlight
Faculty/Staff

campus spotlight photo

Nov. 8, 2016
Jacob Kaucher

Sadie Wolters, center, from Hilton, and Lindsay Martinescu, from Webster, fourth-year students in RIT’s Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, presented their research on detecting white mold in snap beans using spectral remote sensing and drones at the “Systems and Technologies for Remote Sensing Applications Through Unmanned Aerial Systems,” or STRATUS 2016, Workshop at RIT on Oct. 28. The workshop— sponsored by RIT’s Center for Imaging Science, IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society, Pictometry and Headwall Photonics— brought together academics, industry representatives and domain specialists to share perspectives on UAS imaging. The UAS Center is an RIT signature research area.

RIT hosts workshop on unmanned aerial systems Oct. 28
research
Remote Sensing

Oct. 25, 2016
Susan Gawlowicz

Rochester Institute of Technology will host a workshop on unmanned aerial systems and the technological advances that are shaping this rapidly evolving field.

RIT’s first “Systems and Technologies for Remote Sensing Applications Through Unmanned Aerial Systems,” or STRATUS 2016, Workshop will take place from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Oct. 28 in Louise Slaughter Hall, rooms 2210-2240, on the RIT campus. Pre-registration is $25 in advance and $35 on the day of the event. Students attend free.

This workshop will bring together academics, industry representatives and domain specialists to share perspectives on UAS, or drones:

  • to monitor cyanobacterial blooms;
  • to monitor freshwater environments;
  • to detect white mold on snap beans and map corn yield;
  • to advance the technology and integration of drone platforms on sensors; and
  • to understand the impact of drones on business and imaging policy implications.

“Low-cost, easy-to-use drone platforms have created an explosion of applications,” said Carl Salvaggio, professor in RIT’s Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, workshop sponsor and exhibits chair. “Generating imagery is not the same as generating information. We’re interested in how to best use this technology in order to provide us with new and improved information that will help us learn more about the world we are observing.”

Salvaggio and David Messinger, director of the Center for Imaging Science, lead the UAS imaging research group, an RIT signature research area. RIT’s drone research group, which is a member of the Property Drone Consortium, advances UAS-based remote sensing across different application areas, such a precision agriculture and infrastructure monitoring, including buildings, bridges, pipelines and power utilities.

“The UAS Center goal is to act as a ‘technology bridge’ between the user community and the technology providers,” Messinger said.

The STRATUS workshop is made possible, in part, by a $3,400 grant from the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society won by Emmett Ientilucci, research professor in RIT’s Center for Imaging Science and general chair of the workshop.

“This award, along with the financial support of Pictometry, allowed us to keep registration fees low, waive fees for students and provide an award for the best student paper,” Ientilucci said. “It is our intention that this becomes an annual workshop.”

RIT and Headwall Photonics contributed additional support for the event.

For more information about the STRATUS 2016 Workshop, contact Emmett Ientilucci at Emmett@cis.rit.edu.

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Original Source: University News

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