About / News / Full News Story

Program on high-resolution imaging project discussed
Graduate
Remote Sensing

Colin Axel gave a visual demonstration of the capabilities of computerized technology to analyze high resolution digital photographs of areas impacted by a natural disaster. The results are then provided to emergency responders.

May. 7, 2015
David Luitweiler

 

Speaker Colin Axel gives his presentation on the high resolution imaging project.Speaker Colin Axel gives his presentation on the high resolution imaging project. Club President-Elect John Summers is in the foreground. Submitted by Dave Luitweiler.

 

Colin Axel, a 2010 graduate of Victor High School and Rochester Institute of Technology and currently in his third year of a Ph.D program at RIT, presented a program to the Victor-Farmington Rotary Club on April 22 concerning the topic of high resolution imaging.

Axel’s presentation — “Automated Natural Disaster Analysis Using Remote Sensing” — concerned a project he is working on at RIT involving the use of digital imaging to assist those responsible for responding to natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, floods, etc. The project is being funded by the World Bank and involves the U.S. Department of Transportation.

RIT is working on one facet of the project while Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is working in a coordinated fashion with another aspect of the work.

Using a computerized slide program, Axel gave a visual demonstration of the capabilities of computerized technology to analyze high resolution digital photographs of areas impacted by a natural disaster. The results are then provided to emergency responders.Colin and the RIT team used digital images taken from an aerial platform of the 2010 earthquake that devastated Haiti as part of their research in developing their program. Using advanced technology, researchers can use the 3-D images in a myriad of ways to determine damage to buildings, the depth of flood waters, damage to infrastructures, the volume of debris, the status or location of usable roads, etc. This information can be provided quickly to those responding to the disaster, usually in days rather than weeks.

Axel outlined three items that are most important to those responsible at the site of the disaster: where do people need the most help, how many people are impacted and what roads are accessible for responding to the problem. The use of digital image technology can supply answers.

(Click link below to read the rest of this story, which regards club matters and is unrelated to Colin's talk.)   

Read More Read Full Story »
Original Source: Victor Post