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Friday, October 28, 2016 - 08:00 - Systems and Technologies for Remote Sensing Applications Through Unmanned Aerial Systems

Louise Slaughter Hall, rooms 2210-2240
Friday, October 28, 2016 - 08:00

Rochester Institute of Technology will host a workshop on unmanned aerial systems and the technological advances that are shaping this rapidly evolving field.

RIT’s first “Systems and Technologies for Remote Sensing Applications Through Unmanned Aerial Systems,” or STRATUS 2016, Workshop will take place from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Oct. 28 in Louise Slaughter Hall, rooms 2210-2240, on the RIT campus. Pre-registration is $25 in advance and $35 on the day of the event. Students attend free.

Click here for more information.

Monday, October 17, 2016 - 11:00 - Global Women of Light Symposium

Hyatt Regency Rochester
Monday, October 17, 2016 - 11:00
To celebrate the OSA’s 100th anniversary, WiSTEE Connect (Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Entrepreneurship) is collaborating with the OSA Foundation to organize an international symposium “Global Women of Light” at the 2016 Frontiers in Optics on 17 October 2016 in Rochester, NY, US. The program will be hosted at the Hyatt Regency Rochester from 11:00-17:00.
 
To register for this event please sign up by clicking here. Note that you do not have to register for the conference and the registration for the symposium is free. Men, women, students, and professionals alike are invited to attend!
 
The overall goal of the “Global Women of Light” symposium is to shine light upon women's careers in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and entrepreneurship, recruit women across career ranks and disciplines, and build a sustainable community of women in both academia and industry from which career growth, mobility, and leadership opportunities may be sought out.
 
WiSTEE Connect (www.wisteeconnect.org) is an organization which serves to connect female students, faculty members, scientists, and engineers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Entrepreneurship (STEE) from universities, government labs, and private companies. The vision of WiSTEE Connect is to promote women leadership in STEE and assist women involved in these areas to gain regional and/or global connections and recognition. This organization, started in upstate New York, helps to bridge the gap between science and entrepreneurship while providing a forum though which women in these fields may learn, connect, and lead.
 
I hope you will be able to join me and other women from around the world for a thought-provoking and impactful program focused on moving the careers of women in our field forward.
 
Sincerely,
 
Jie Qiao, Ph.D, M.B.A.
Founder, WiSTEE Connect
Associate Professor
Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science
Rochester Institute of Technology
 

Monday, November 16, 2015 - 17:00 - Imaging Science Graduate Study Information Session

Carlson 1275
Monday, November 16, 2015 - 17:00

The Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science invites you to an open house informational session to learn about graduate study in the rapidly expanding field of Imaging Science. Full- or part-time study will lead to a Master of Science (MS) or Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree. Our hands-on degree programs prepare our graduates to have an immediate impact in imaging-related technology, research, and applications in industry, government, or academia.

Applications are now being accepted for Fall 2016 admission with a priority deadline of 15 January 2016. Graduate Assistantships are available for both the MS and PhD degrees. Admission and funding decisions will be announced by 1 March 2016.

Informational sessions will be held

Tuesday, November 10, 5-6 pm in Carlson 1275, and
Monday, November 16, 5-6 pm in Carlson 1275.

Refreshments will be provided. Faculty and current students will be available to provide information about the program and answer questions. Interpreters will be provided upon request.

For more information contact Prof. John Kerekes, Graduate Program Coordinator, 585-475-6996, kerekes@cis.rit.edu, or visit our website at http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/overview.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015 - 17:00 - Imaging Science Graduate Study Information Session

Carlson 1275
Tuesday, November 10, 2015 - 17:00

The Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science invites you to an open house informational session to learn about graduate study in the rapidly expanding field of Imaging Science. Full- or part-time study will lead to a Master of Science (MS) or Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree. Our hands-on degree programs prepare our graduates to have an immediate impact in imaging-related technology, research, and applications in industry, government, or academia.

Applications are now being accepted for Fall 2016 admission with a priority deadline of 15 January 2016. Graduate Assistantships are available for both the MS and PhD degrees. Admission and funding decisions will be announced by 1 March 2016.

Informational sessions will be held

Tuesday, November 10, 5-6 pm in Carlson 1275, and
Monday, November 16, 5-6 pm in Carlson 1275.

Refreshments will be provided. Faculty and current students will be available to provide information about the program and answer questions. Interpreters will be provided upon request.

For more information contact Prof. John Kerekes, Graduate Program Coordinator, 585-475-6996, kerekes@cis.rit.edu, or visit our website at http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/overview.

Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:00 - CIS Director candidate Dr. Charles Ichoku "The value of satellite imaging in environmental research: examples with wildfire monitoring"

Carlson 76-1275
Thursday, June 11, 2015 - 01:00
Thursday, June 11, 2015 CIS Director Candidate Dr. Charles Ichoku Seminar The value of satellite imaging in environmental research: examples with wildfire monitoring Charles Ichoku NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA. ABSTRACT Over the past two centuries, imaging science has been increasingly providing tremendous benefits to all of our lives for medical, domestic, environmental, security, and recreational purposes, as well as in other ways too numerous to list. During the last few decades, satellite imaging has literally taken this science to a whole new level, by providing us regional to global perspectives through monitoring our environment from the vantage point of space, and even allowing us the privilege to visualize other planets and far away galaxies. One of the environmental research areas that have benefited from scientific uses of space imaging is in monitoring wildfires on a regional to global scale. Wildfires and other types of biomass burning are seasonal phenomena in different land ecosystems around the world. These fires, which can originate from natural or anthropogenic causes, depending on region and circumstances, are estimated to consume biomass containing a total of 2-5 petagrams of carbon globally every year, generating intense heat energy, and emitting smoke plumes that comprise different species of aerosols and trace gases. Many of these fire emissions when produced in large amounts can have adverse effects on human health, air quality, and environmental processes. Detection of these fires and characterization of their behavior patterns and their smoke emission source strengths globally is highly important to adequately constrain our knowledge of biomass burning impacts on society, the environment, and climate. Satellite measurement of fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate or power (FRP) has been found to have a direct relationship with the rates of biomass fuel consumption and emissions of major smoke constituents. In this presentation, we will show how the satellite measurement of FRP is facilitating the quantitative characterization of biomass burning, thereby contributing significantly to a variety of important environmental applications. Address for correspondence: Dr. Charles ICHOKU Climate & Radiation Lab., Code 613 NASA/GSFC, Building 33, Room A315 Greenbelt, MD 20771, U.S.A. Phone : (1) 301-614-6212 Fax : (1) 301-614-6307 or (1) 301-614-6420 E-mail : Charles.Ichoku@nasa.gov

Sunday, June 7, 2015 - 15:30 - 9th Annual DC-area Alumni Reception

Vinifera Bistro
Sunday, June 7, 2015 - 15:30

9TH ANNUAL GREATER D.C. IMAGING SCIENCE REUNION

Date: 6/7/2015
Time: 3:30 PM to 6:30 PM

Cost: $10

Location: Vinifera Bistro

 

Join your fellow alumni and favorite faculty at the 9th Annual Greater D.C. Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science (CIS) Reunion. Our department members coming to see you are: 

  • Dr. Dave Messinger, Director of the Center for Imaging Science 

  • Joe Pow, Associate Director of the Center for Imaging Science 

  • Dr. Jie Qiao, Associate Professor

  • Bethany Choate '06, Senior Associate for Outreach and Communications

  • Nathan Dileas, First-year BS student 

  • Makayla Roof, First-year BS student

Listen to RIT’s exciting developments in CIS and what the future holds for current RIT students and alumni. Share your accomplishments with us and reminisce with your colleagues on the beautiful Vinifera Bistro patio. Heavy hors d’oeuvres and drinks will be served. Guest fee is just $10 and space is limited so register today!

RSVP by May 27, 2015

Contact: Tamra Werner, 585-475-5979, tjwdar@rit.edu

 

Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 13:00 - CIS Director Candidate Seminar: David Messinger - Known Signature Detection in Hyperspectral Imagery Using Non-Parametric Data Models

CAR-1275
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 13:00

Known Signature Detection in Hyperspectral Imagery Using Non-Parametric Data Models

David Messinger

Associate Professor; Interim Director
Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science
Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY

One common application of hyperspectral imagery is the detection of rare objects with a known spectral signature in large area coverage scenes.  These targets can sometimes even be unresolved forming the sub-pixel detection problem.  This problem is typically addressed using a hypothesis test: is the pixel under test more likely to be my target of interest or more likely to be “background.”  Consequently, one needs a mathematical model of each of these two hypotheses, and the problem is generally formulated based on assumptions that the data are Gaussian distributed and / or can be represented via a linear subspace geometry.  Several years ago we asked the question, for a given target in a given scene, which approach is best?  The results lead us to the conclusion that the performance of these algorithms has proven difficult to predict for a given image and a given target signature.  Building off previous work using graph-based methods for analyzing spectral imagery, we are now investigating new approaches to target detection that do not levy such assumptions on the data.  I will present two approaches to this problem.  The first attempts to characterize the manifold that the background and target pixels lie on in the hyperspace, and then applies traditional algorithms for target detection in the manifold coordinates.  The other is based on Schroedinger Eigenmaps and presents a non-linear data transformation that uses a priori information about the target signature to ``push’’ target-like pixels into a very specific portion of the new, transformed space where a detection statistic can be developed.  Both methods show promise while still having challenges.  However both demonstrate a path to new, non-parametric algorithms for target detection in hyperspectral imagery.  The end goal is to learn more about how these data-driven approaches to spectral image processing can be used to indicate, in some predicable way, what is the best algorithm to use for a specific problem at hand.

Speaker's CV (Partial)

David W. Messinger, Ph.D.

Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science
Rochester Institute of Technology
54 Lomb Memorial Dr.
Rochester, NY 14623
Phone: (585) 475 - 4538
E-mail: messinger@cis.rit.edu

 

EDUCATION:

Ph.D., Physics (September 1998), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
Thesis Title: “New Methods for Studying Interstellar Continuum and Spectral Polarization”
Thesis Advisor: W.G. Roberge, Ph.D.

B.S., Physics, Graduate with Distinction (May 1991), Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY

 

PROFESSIONAL SUMMARY:

Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science,
Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY

Associate Professor (2014 - present),
Interim Director, Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science (2014 - present)

My research investigates the general problem of developing methods to extract quantitative information from spectral, airborne and space-based imagery. Specific efforts include the detection of man made phenomena in large area imagery and application of advanced mathematical techniques to spectral image processing. Other research interests include the use of physics-based signatures to augment methods of hyperspectral image exploitation and the use of remote sensing techniques for multi-disciplinary research such as Archeology and Disaster Management.

The Center for Imaging Science (CIS) is an interdisciplinary academic unit within the College of Science at RIT offering degrees in Imaging Science at the BS, MS, and Ph.D. levels. The pedagogical and research focus of CIS is the “imaging chain,” ranging from basic light-matter interaction phenomenology, to sensors, imaging systems, and processing of image data to provide information. The Center typically supports approximately 40 undergraduate students and over 100 graduate students with 20 full time faculty with their primary appointment in CIS and an additional 30 affiliated faculty across the RIT community. Additionally, the Center is home to over 40 research and administrative staff. The Center is a strong, interdisciplinary research organization operating with an annual research revenue of approximately $6M spread across imaging communities such as consumer electronics, government agencies, the aerospace industry, and the medical community. I was appointed as the Interim Director in 2014 after the previous Director had decided to move on to another position.

Associate Research Professor (2010 - 2014),
Assistant Research Professor (2007 - 2010),
Director, Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory, (2007 - 2014)

As Director of the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing (DIRS) Laboratory, I oversaw and coordinated the research efforts of ten faculty in CIS, 15 full time research staff, and over 40 undergraduate and graduate students. The Laboratory operates with annual research revenue of approximately $4M.

Research Scientist (2002 - 2007),
Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory

I performed research into spectral image processing techniques supporting research programs within the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory. This work was partially funded through an Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship. My research focused on the detection and characterization of gaseous effluent plumes in thermal hyperspectral imagery, as well as the development of physics-based algorithms for target detection in reflective hyperspectral imagery.

Aerospace Engineer (2000 - 2002),
Northrop Grumman
, Exton, PA

I designed and implemented innovative algorithms to track clusters of ballistic objects during midcourse flight in the SBIRS-Low Program. I developed a medium-fidelity, pixel-level, infrared sensor and signal processing simulation to evaluate system requirements and algorithms as well as provided in-house infrared phenomenological expertise.

Analyst (1998 - 2000),
XonTech, Inc.
, Special Studies Division, Van Nuys, CA

My work with the Internal Research and Development group required the development of algorithms to determine sea-surface characteristics such as ocean wave spectra from data acquired with the NASA-JPL AVIRIS sensor. I implemented physical and statistical models of infrared and hyperspectral data as well as used signal and image processing techniques to further these efforts.

 

CURRENT RESEARCH INTERESTS:

  • Investigation of physical and geophysical processes through analysis of remotely sensed data
  • Multispectral & hyperspectral image exploitation
    • Spectral feature extraction
    • Large area image search
    • Target detection using physics-based signatures
    • Spectral image characterization
    • Application of advanced mathematical tools to spectral imagery
  • LIDAR imaging

 

ADMINISTRATIVE EXPERIENCE:

Interim Director, Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science (2014 - present):
I am responsible for the overall operation and leadership of the Center for Imaging Science, including oversight of faculty, research staff, and administrative staff. I am responsible for coordinating both the academic and research programs within the Center and serve as the Ph.D. Program Director, representing CIS at Institute level graduate education discussions. Additionally, I serve on the Executive Council of the College of Science.

Director, Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (2008 - 2014):
I was responsible for coordinating and overseeing the research programs for those affiliated to the laboratory, managing several funded research programs, conducting annual staff performance evaluations, development of the annual report, and laboratory business development efforts. The laboratory includes ten faculty, 15 full time research staff, and >40 students at the BS, MS, and Ph.D. levels. Other responsibilities included proposal writing to support the faculty, staff, and students, interfacing with research sponsors and RIT administrators, as well as strategic planning for the laboratory and management of discretionary funds.

Interim Director, Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Laboratory (2007 - 2008):
I was responsible for coordinating and overseeing the research programs for those affiliated to the laboratory while the Director was on sabbatical. This included six faculty, 10 full time research staff, and 30 graduate students at the MS and Ph.D. levels.

DIRS Algorithm and Phenomenology Group Leader (2004 - 2008):
I was responsible for the management of two full-time staff scientists and their affiliated graduate and undergraduate students. This involved personnel and budgetary management as well as contributing to the planning and proposal process for the DIRS Laboratory.

Member of the RIT College of ScienceWomen in Science (WISe) Advisory Board, 2011 - present

Member of the RIT College of Science Strategic Planning Core Committee, 2010-2012

Member of the RIT Steering Committee for the RIT - North Carolina A&T Partnership, 2011

Member of the Advisory Board for the Biannual Publication, Research at RIT, 2008 - 2012

Member of the Organizing Committee for the Dept. of Energy Conference on Data Analysis (CoDA), 2013 - present

Member of the Technical Program Committee: SPIE Conference on Algorithms and Technologies for Multispectral, Hyperspectral, and Ultraspectral Imagery, 2009 - present

Co-Chair of the Special Joint Session: Remote Sensing and Natural Disasters 2012: SPIE Remote Sensing Europe, Edinburgh, Scotland

Member of the Search Committee: School of Mathematical Science Faculty Search, RIT, 2012-2013

Member of the Search Committee: Director of the Nanopower Research Laboratory, RIT, 2011-2012

Member of the Search Committee: Director of the Center for Imaging Science, RIT, 2003

Member of the Search Committee: Remote Sensing Faculty, Center for Imaging Science, RIT, 2003

Member of the Local Organizing Committee for the conference: Polarimetry of the Interstellar Medium, Troy, NY, June 1995

Member of the Graduate Student Committee: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Physics Dept., 1994 - 1996

 

 

HONORS AND AFFILIATIONS:

“Top Research Presentation at NGA Academic Research Program Symposium and Workshops”, USGIF, September 2010, research to be presented as invited talk at GEOINT 2010

“Best Research Demonstration”, NGA Academic Research Program Symposium and Workshops, September 2010

Member of the USGIF Academic Advisory Board, June 2013 - present

Academic Advisor to the US Department of Homeland Security Remote Sensing Advisory Board, 2010-2012

Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2003 - 2005

Member of IEEE, Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS)

Member of SPIE

Member of the US Geospatial-Intelligence Foundation (USGIF)

Department of Education Fellowship, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Jan. 1997 - Aug. 1997

Graduate with Distinction, Clarkson University, May 1991

 

Full CV

 

Thursday, May 14, 2015 - 15:00 - CIS Director Candidate Seminar: Shouleh Nikzad - Seeing the unseen: The Ultraviolet Universe From Nebulae to Neurons

CAR-2155
Thursday, May 14, 2015 - 15:00

Seeing the unseen:
The Ultraviolet Universe From Nebulae to Neurons

Shouleh Nikzad

Advanced Detectors, Imaging Systems, and Nanoscience Group
Instrument Science and Data Systems Division
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109

The ultraviolet spectral range is rich with key information that can be employed to study planets, protoplanets, intergalactic medium, supernovae, star formation,  galaxy evolution, and more. In addition, ultraviolet has applications in biology, neuroscience, neurosurgery, and criminology. Because silicon is not naturally sensitive to UV photons, back illumination and band structure engineering with nano-scale control is required to make high efficiency imagers. High efficiency detectors enable instruments and systems which can be used for faint object detection, observation, and exploration. Similar techniques developed in silicon can be applied to other semiconductor systems and instrument developed for space applications can be used in medical applications.

In this talk, we will briefly review digital imagers, detectors and instrument requirements in the ultraviolet, visible, and near infrared spectral range. We will discuss detector enhancement using nanoscale control over surfaces and interfaces. We will discuss the synergy between NASA and other fields when it comes to instruments and sensors. We will discuss various applications of these devices developed in our laboratory as well as spinoffs of the techniques to different material systems, devices, and instrumentations. 

 

Speaker's Long Bio:

Dr. Shouleh Nikzad is a Senior Research Scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), a position conferred by the JPL’s Director and the Office of the Chief Scientist in recognition of her achievements. She is also a Principal Member of the Staff and she leads the Advanced Visible/Ultraviolet Detector Imaging Systems and Nanoscience Group at JPL.

Her interests in research span a wide range of fields, including materials, devices, astrophysics, space weather, and medicine. Dr. Nikzad’s work in non-equilibrium techniques to modify surface and interface bandstructures has pioneered high performance imaging devices. 

Dr. Nikzad has initiated, developed and managed successful and innovative technology development programs, including the development of advanced UV and visible imagers and cameras, broadband UV-NIR detector arrays, soft x ray detectors, solid-state charged and neutral particle detectors, human-eye-inspired curved focal plane arrays, and nanostructure based devices.

Her work on single photon counting UV imaging has produced world record sensitivity in UV that enables future NASA missions mapping of the intergalactic medium, studying primitive bodies as well as Europa and its moons.

Her team also holds the record on low energy ion and neutral detection energy threshold after they improved that by an order of magnitude. This work enables compact and low power instruments for Space Weather and mass spectrometry instruments that can be used in a variety of fields including planetary atmospheric studies, life detection, and commercial applications.

Shouleh is the president-elect for Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics (SBMT). She has been with the SBMT since it’s inception and has organized a “New Horizon” session in which NASA scientists shared their work with nuerosurgeons and neuroscientist. This effort has spawned many collaborative efforts that have led to using NASA technology in medicine.

She is the recipient of several awards including the Lew Allen Award of Excellence, NASA Space Act Awards, JPL Instrument Division Team awards for, and the TAP Team award for development of high speed UV camera. She was honored by the Society for Brain Mapping and Therapeutics (SBMT)’s highest award of Pioneer in Medicine in 2013 for her leadership in technology for medicine. In 2012, She was elected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society. Shouleh has been recognized and featured by the IEEE’s Women in Engineering (2011) and the SPIE’s Women in Optics (2012) for being a pioneer and role model. She is frequently asked to speak at middle and high schools on her work.

Dr. Nikzad is Visiting Faculty at Caltech’s Physics Math, and Astronomy Division and Cedar Sinai Neurosurgery Department. She holds a PhD in Applied Physics from Caltech, a MSEE from Caltech and a BS degree in Electrical Engineering (Electrophysics) from USC. She has over 50 publications and holds over 10 US patents.

Speaker's Short Bio:

Dr. Nikzad leads the Advanced Detectors, Imaging System, and Nanoscience Group at JPL where she has initiated and developed many successful detector, device, and imaging instrument programs, including high performance back illuminated imaging arrays, end-to-end post fabrication processing, human-eye inspired curved focal plane arrays, III-N photocathodes, low-energy particle detectors, novel UV imaging spectrometer, high speed UV camera, and compact UV camera. Her research interests include UV-NIR imaging array, advanced epitaxial techniques and device applications; bandstructure and interface engineering using epitaxial techniques; kinetics of growth; nanostructures fabrication and nanostructure-based devices. Her interests extend into the application including space and medicine. 

 

Wednesday, May 6, 2015 - 18:00 - SPIE/OSA Seminar: Imaging Science and Cell Phone Cameras - Dr. Chris Dainty

Carlson Auditorium
Wednesday, May 6, 2015 - 18:00

View Presentation Video ►


The RIT SPIE/OSA Student Chapter is sponsoring a talk by distinguished physicist Dr. Chris Dainty:

This talk is in two parts.  First I shall describe the concept of the ideal detector, using the metric of detective quantum efficiency (DQE), which is the ratio of output to input signal-to-noise ratio.  Although DQE was first proposed nearly 70 years ago, it is still the single most important figure of merit of a detector.   The main part of the talk will focus on cell-phone cameras.  Every optics student knows that bigger optical systems have the potential to form higher resolution and higher signal-to-noise images, yet market pressures drive cell phone cameras to be smaller and smaller.  I shall discuss some of the fundamental limits of imaging systems that affect image quality in small cameras.

Professor Dainty's research interests are in optical imaging, scattering and propagation.  In these areas he has published books: 'Scattering in Volumes and Surfaces' (1989, co-edited with M Nieto-Vesperinas), 'Laser Speckle and Related Phenomena' (1975, 2nd Ed. 1984, editor) and 'Image Science' (1974) which he co-authored with Rodney Shaw.  His past research interests are adaptive optics, vision science, scattering, atmospheric propagation, polarisation and partially coherent imaging. His current interests are focussed in imaging and metrology, especially in the eye.

Chris Dainty is the 1984 recipient of the International Commission of Optics Prize, the 1993 Thomas Young Medal and Prize (UK Institute of Physics), the 2003 C E K Mees Medal and Prize (OSA) and the Optics and Photonics Division Prize 2004 (IoP).  He is also a  Fellow of The Optical Society of America, SPIE, The Institute of Physics (UK) and The European Optical Society.    From 1983 to 1985 and 2005 to 2007 he was elected to the Board of Directors of the Optical Society of America: 1987–1990 he was elected Secretary-General of the ICO, President for the term 1990–1993 and was Past-President for 1993 to 1996: and 1994 to 1996 he was elected to the Board of SPIE.   Prof Dainty served on the Council of the UK Institute of Physics (1996 – 1999).  He was President of The European Optical Society from 2002 to 2004. In 2011, he was President of the Optical Society of America. From 1994 to 2002 he was editor of Optics Communications, handling almost 5000 manuscripts over nine years.

 

Related Links:

Presentation Video

RIT's News announcement

Announcement on the SPIE/OSA Student Chapter website

Friday, May 1, 2015 - 14:00 - Alumni Panel Discussion with Imaging Science and Photographic Science and Instrumentation Students

Carlson Auditorium
Friday, May 1, 2015 - 14:00

Alumni Panel Discussion with
Imaging Science and Photographic Science
and Instrumentation Students

Friday, May 1, 2:00 - 3:00 p.m.


RIT alumni have been at the forefront of dramatic changes in both imaging systems and their applications over the past several decades.  Photographic Science and Instrumentation Alumni Panelists from the class of 1975 will discuss the evolution of imaging systems over the past 40 years, spanning the range from film to digital systems and the growth in the applications of imaging systems to solve a host of real-world problems.  Building on their education at RIT, panelists will describe the changes in the world of imaging they have seen over the past 4 decades spanning a variety of career paths, and provide their view on the future of digital imaging. Panel will be moderated by David Messinger, Interim Director, COS Center for Imaging Science.

This panel is presented by the College of Science, Center for Imaging Science and the Office of Development and Alumni Relations. For more information, contact Jane Tibbitts by phone at 585.475.7953 or via email at jxtdar@rit.edu.

To request interpretive service please visit myaccess.rit.edu.

Class of '75 Photographic Science and Instrumentation Alumni Panelists:

Jerry Covey is retired from his many and varied careers: System Analyst for the Central Intelligence Agency; Vice President & Farm Manager for a family farm and ranch business in Colorado; Project Manager and System Integration Manager for GE Aerospace and Lockheed Martin; Business Systems Analyst and System Testing Manager for The Vanguard Group (Mutual Funds). Jerry lives in Coatesville, PA, where he enjoys golfing, playing pool, motorcycling, traveling, and spending time with his wife and grandchildren.

Richard Frisicano started his career as an emulsion chemist.  He transitioned to digital imaging and software as a government contractor long before these technologies had commercial significance, and finished his career managing a laser-based remote sensing venture. His employers included Rochester Film, Bell & Howell, Eastman Kodak, ITT and numerous spin-offs. Imaging was a fast-changing field and Richard’s education, background, and experience allowed him to leave old products and technology behind, while successfully transitioning to projects with exciting and emerging technologies that changed the world.  Richard currently lives in Rochester, NY.

Jeffrey Harris applied both system engineering and management skills to help foster new technologies, programs and capabilities that contributed significantly to US national security while in government and industry. Job responsibilities included Director of National Reconnaissance Office, Assistant Secretary of Air Force, Satellite and Space Systems with Lockheed Martin and commercial imagery from space with Space Imaging. Jeff continues to advise, consult and serves as an RIT Trustee helping to guide the University’s bright future. Jeff currently lives in Arnold, MD, enjoying the Chesapeake Bay.

Howard Bozenhard began working for the Eastman Kodak Company in June of 1975 as a Wholesale Photofinishing Equipment Specialist which entailed developing, launching and supporting high speed color photographic printers for use in the worldwide consumer photofinishing market. Over his 40 year career, he worked in many historic advancements of consumer photography including the development of a new film format (Advanced Photo System), PhotoCD and digital printing technologies including thermal, inkjet and laser printing systems. After the demise of photographic film, he transitioned to support digital minilabs and currently specializes in remote support and management of nearly 50,000 Kodak Alaris photo kiosks.

Len Parker worked in Santa Monica, CA for a laser system company then began a 26-year west coast career with Xerox in L.A. and Palo Alto, helping the company commercialize laser printing. Len returned to Rochester in 2006, finishing his 30 years with the company as the Chief Engineer of Xerox Corporation, and later VP of Strategy & Business Development. Len is semi-retired and remains in Rochester, sharing his time between Business Consulting in Intellectual Assets, and traveling. Len also enjoys the Finger Lakes, cross-country skiing, renovating his home, and serving on the President’s Roundtable at RIT.

Location:Center for Imaging Science
Carlson Auditorium
Room #1125

Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 16:30 - RIT Outstanding Undergraduate Scholarship Awards

Gordon Field House and Activities Center
Thursday, April 16, 2015 - 16:30

Outstanding Undergraduate Scholarship Awards

Thursday, April 16

4:30 p.m. Reception

5:30 p.m. Procession and Ceremony

Imaging Science recipient: Elizabeth Bondi

Join us on Thursday, April 16, as we celebrate the 2014-2015 Outstanding Undergraduate Scholars!  The celebration begins with a reception at 4:30 p.m. followed by the awards ceremony at 5:30 p.m.  Both events will be held in the Gordon Field House and Activities Center.  All members of the RIT community are welcomed to attend!  

Monday, April 13, 2015 - 18:00 - RIT & NASA Present Dr. Donald Pettit

Webb Auditorium
Monday, April 13, 2015 - 18:00

 RIT & NASA Present Dr. Donald Pettit
Monday, April 13, 6:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Lecture with Dr. Donald Pettit, NASA

 

 Astronauts' Guide to Photography in Space Lecture
Followed by Audience Q&A with
Dr. Donald Pettit

NASA Astronaut & International Space Station Astrophotographer

Dr. Pettit's innovative photographic work and passion for low light photography, has changed the way we see earth from space. A veteran of three space flights, he has logged more than 370 days in space and over 13 EVA (spacewalk) hours. He lived aboard the International Space Station (ISS) for 5-1/2 months during Expedition 6, was a member of the STS-126 crew, and again lived aboard the station for 6-1/2 months as part of the Expedition 30/31 crew. 

Dr. Pettit will share the photographic challenges faced by astronauts on board the International Space Station, some of the ingenious solutions he developed during his time on the ISS and stunning photography, videos and time lapse movies live with commentary.

ASL sign language interpreting will be provided upon request.

Lecture is free and open to the public.

Location:Webb Auditorium
James E. Booth Hall
RIT Campus

 

Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 19:00 - New Light on Henricus Martellus’s World Map at Yale (c. 1491): Multispectral Imaging and Early Renaissance Cartography

Carlson Auditorium
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 19:00

View Presentation Video >

maps

The Martellus map on an easel, which allowed the object to be repositioned for the camera. Image courtesy of Chet Van Duzer.

Related News Articles:

Abstract: In this talk I will give an account of a recent NEH-funded project to make multispectral images of a world map made by Henricus Martellus in about 1491, which is held by the Beinecke Library at Yale. This large map has long been thought to be one of the most important of the fifteenth century, and was thought to have influenced Martin Waldseemüller’s world map of 1507, but the many texts on the map were illegible due to fading and damage, and thus its exact place in Renaissance cartography was impossible to determine. The new multispectral images have rendered many of the previously illegible texts on the map legible. I will explain why the Martellus map was an excellent candidate for multispectral imaging, describe the process of making the images, show some of the results, and give an account of the place of the Martellus map in late fifteenth- and early sixteenth-century cartography. 

Bio: Chet Van Duzer has published extensively on medieval and Renaissance maps in journals such as Imago Mundi, Terrae Incognitae and Word & Image. He is also the author of Johann Schöner’s Globe of 1515: Transcription and Study, the first detailed analysis of one of the earliest surviving terrestrial globes that includes the New World; and (with John Hessler) Seeing the World Anew: The Radical Vision of Martin Waldseemüller’s 1507 & 1516 World Maps. His book Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps was published in 2013 by the British Library, and in 2014 the Library of Congress published a study of Christopher Columbus’s Book of Privileges which he co-authored with John Hessler and Daniel De Simone. His current book projects are a study of Henricus Martellus’s world map of c. 1491 at Yale University, and the commentary for a facsimile of the 1550 manuscript world map by Pierre Desceliers, which will be published by the British Library.

Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 10:00 - RIT Spring Career Fair

Gordon Field House
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 10:00

Wednesday, March 4, 2015 from 10am-4pm

15 companies have directly expressed interest in Imaging Science:

  • Ahold
  • Apple
  • Carestream Health
  • Eastman Kodak
  • Exelis
  • HCL America
  • Independent Can Company
  • Kodak Alaris
  • Ortho Clinical Diagnostics
  • Ricoh Print Productions
  • Rochester Regional Health Systems
  • Us Department of Defense
  • US Marine Corps Officer Programs
  • US Navy
  • Xerox

Map of participating companies (PDF)

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 - 16:30 - Apple Recruiting Meet & Greet

Fireside Lounge
Tuesday, February 10, 2015 - 16:30

This is the first time Apple has arranged their own Recruiting Meet and Greet at RIT.  We expect over 10 Apple managers to participate.  Imaging Science has been confirmed as one of the groups they would like to attend this event.  

The event is being held in the Fireside Lounge from 4:30-8pm on Tuesday, February 10th.  Don’t miss this awesome opportunity to speak with Apple Managers! Bring multiple copies of your resume. 

Be sure to check Job Zone and Apple’s Career Page before the event so you have an idea of the wealth of opportunities available.  

Pre-registration is required: http://appleeu.avature.net/ursite?jobId=1341&source=UR%20Job%20Posting&tags=rit|rit_appleday_winter2015

To request an Interpreter please visit: https://myaccess.rit.edu

Monday, February 2, 2015 - 17:00 - UTC Aerospace Systems Pizza & Soda Info Session

CAR-1275 (CIS Fishbowl)
Monday, February 2, 2015 - 17:00

Chris Jengo and Jim Luening from UTC Aerospace Systems will be at RIT on Feb 3 for interviews with Imaging Science and Software Engineering students.

The evening before, starting at 5PM on Feb 2, CIS/UTAS will host an evening “Pizza and Soda” meeting where Chris and Jim will make a brief informal presentation and spread the word about five new-grad openings (three in image science and two in software) and three internship opportunities (available for this spring or summer).

Both the full-time and intern positions will be open to both undergraduate students and graduate students (full-time positions for those graduating in the May timeframe). They will also have an interview sign-up sheet so those who have not already applied can do so then and there.

ImSci students are also invited to a breakfast on February 3rd in Golisano from 8:30-9:50.

Please note, these sessions and interviews are for US Citizens only.

Friday, December 5, 2014 - 11:00 - RIT College of Science Distinguished Speaker Dr. Carl Haber Technical Lecture

CAR-2155
Friday, December 5, 2014 - 11:00

MacArthur Foundation Fellow Carl Haber
Audio Preservationist, Senior Scientist, Physics Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
See more at: http://www.macfound.org/fellows/892/

Dr. Haber will elaborate upon the public lecture with technical details about the equipment and process of recreating audio from early recordings.

Sound was first recorded and reproduced by Thomas Edison in 1877. Until about 1950, when magnetic tape use became common, most recordings were made on mechanical media such as wax, foil, shellac, lacquer, and plastic. Some of these older recordings contain material of great historical interest, may be in obsolete formats, and are damaged, decaying, or are now considered too delicate to play. Unlike print and latent image scanning, the playback of mechanical sound carriers has been an inherently invasive process. Recently, a series of techniques, based upon non-contact optical metrology and image processing, have been applied to create and analyze high resolution digital surface profiles of these materials. Numerical methods may be used to emulate the stylus motion through such a profile in order to reconstruct the recorded sound. This approach, and current results, including studies of some of the earliest known sound recordings, are the focus of this talk and will be illustrated with sounds and images. Additional information can be found at http://irene.lbl.gov/

Thursday, December 4, 2014 - 13:00 - RIT College of Science Distinguished Speaker Dr. Carl Haber Public Lecture

Gosnell Hall 08-A300
Thursday, December 4, 2014 - 13:00

MacArthur Foundation Fellow Carl Haber
Audio Preservationist, Senior Scientist, Physics Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
See more at: http://www.macfound.org/fellows/892/

Sound was first recorded and reproduced by Thomas Edison in 1877. Until about 1950, when magnetic tape use became common, most recordings were made on mechanical media such as wax, foil, shellac, lacquer, and plastic. Some of these older recordings contain material of great historical interest, may be in obsolete formats, and are damaged, decaying, or are now considered too delicate to play. Unlike print and latent image scanning, the playback of mechanical sound carriers has been an inherently invasive process. Recently, a series of techniques, based upon non-contact optical metrology and image processing, have been applied to create and analyze high resolution digital surface profiles of these materials. Numerical methods may be used to emulate the stylus motion through such a profile in order to reconstruct the recorded sound. This approach, and current results, including studies of some of the earliest known sound recordings, are the focus of this talk and will be illustrated with sounds and images. Additional information can be found at http://irene.lbl.gov/

Tuesday, December 2, 2014 - 09:30 - Undergraduate Juniors' Color Science Research Poster Session

CAR-1275
Tuesday, December 2, 2014 - 09:30

Imaging Science and Motion Picture Science undergraduate juniors have researched topics for their Color Science course. Their research will culminate in a Poster Session on Tuesday, December 2 at 9:30 in or around the Carlson Learning Center, CAR-1275. Hope to see you there! 

Friday, November 14, 2014 - 13:00 - SPIE/OSA Student Talk Competition

Friday, November 14, 2014 - 13:00

The SPIE/OSA Student Chapter Talk Competition will be Friday, November 14 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. 

Each talk will have 10 minutes. Undergraduate and graduate students will be split into two competitions each with a first and second place. Winners will receive $50 in first place and $25 in second place.  The audience will judge every speaker and winners will be selected based on audience scores.


To submit an abstract, fill out the form found here: http://goo.gl/forms/uu5KBQ0zj8  Abstracts are due by midnight on Wednesday, October 29.

You must be logged in to your RIT gmail or some other gmail account to have access to the form. Submitting an abstract does not guarantee entrance into the competition.  Those who are selected to talk will be notified by Friday, November 1. If you encounter any issues, please email Aly at aba567@rit.edu.

 

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