Graduate Student Handbook - Part 1
THIS MATERIAL IS CURRENTLY UNDERGOING SIGNIFICANT REVISION!
SEE YOUR ADVISOR OR SUE CHAN IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS.
Academic Advising
Confidentiality of Records
Student Policies
Degree Requirements
M.S. Academic Requirements
M.S. Project/Paper Program
Ph.D. Academic Requirements
Ph.D. Study Plan
Student Schedule Worksheet
Course Outlines
Part 2


Academic Advising

The Center offers faculty and staff support to assist with the rigorous demands of the Graduate programs.

Student Records are housed in the Academic Student Services Office, College of Science and in the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science. Administrative support is available to students through these offices in areas of registration, course selection, scheduling, records, and program advisement. Answers to questions are often available on a walk-in basis. Students who wish a consultation should make an appointment with the Academic Coordinator, or the Coordinators of the relevant graduate program.

Faculty advisors can be assigned to all Imaging Science students. More commonly, the student selects a research advisor who then also acts as an academic advisor. Advisors are prepared to assist students with issues regarding curriculum requirements, elective choices, transfer options, RIT support facilities, and concerns of a more personal nature (such as managing your time effectively, making the adjustment to college life or coping with the unexpected). We strongly urge you to establish a firm relationship with a faculty advisor soon after you begin your program of study in Imaging Science.

Confidentiality of Records

In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (commonly known as the Buckley Amendment), RIT students have the right to inspect, review and challenge the accuracy of official educational records.

RIT policy ensures that only proper use is made of such records. With the exception of copies made for internal use (provided by the registrar for advising purposes), copies of a student's permanent record (transcript) or non-public information from student records will not be released without the student's written consent. Official written requests from students must be made for transcript release.

Directory information may be released at any time to persons or agencies indicating a legitimate interest. "Directory Information" includes the following: a student's name, mailing address and telephone number, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation records in official RIT activities and sports, weight and height if a member of an athletic team, dates of attendance at RIT, degrees and awards received.

Student Policies

All RIT policies and regulations as they appear in RIT publications apply in full to the Center for Imaging Science. There are, however, a few additional policies and practices that apply only to Imaging Science. For your guidance, this publication contains an outline of this information.

We hope to provide a quality education for all Imaging Science students. When regulations are ignored, it may be necessary to initiate proceedings through RIT's judicial process, which can lead to restrictions and/or suspensions.

I. Registration Policies

A. Registration

Students are responsible for course registration each quarter. Early telephone registration takes place during each preceding quarter (except fall which begins with the final four weeks of spring quarter). A memo with instructions to students for registration and specific course requirement reminders will be placed in students' mail-folders at the opening of early registration. It is the responsibility of students to make appointments with their faculty advisor at the time of early registration to facilitate course substitutions, elective requests and possible transfer credit requests.

B. Credit Limitations

Students may enroll in no more than 18 credit hours per quarter except with the approval of the graduate coordinator(s). Students are charged per credit hour for each credit exceeding 18 hours. The director or the graduate coordinator may propose to limit the total number of credit hours a student may take per quarter in the event of continued probationary academic standing. Teaching and research assistants cannot register for more than 16 credits plus one research credit without prior approval of the Graduate Coordinator.

C. Schedule Verification

Following early registration, students will receive a Schedule Verification Form from the Registrar's Office. The schedule indicated includes all courses for which the student is registered as of the date of issue. A student may change this schedule at any time up to the end of the first six days of class by following the procedure outlined in the quarterly registration booklet, and with written approval from the graduate coordinator.

D. Program Notices.

Official notification of a students course schedule for a current quarter is issued by the Office of the Registrar approximately three weeks following the first day of class. Check this information carefully. Inaccurate information must be reported to the Academic Coordinator for a correction to be made. It is the student's responsibility to check the accuracy of this information and to pursue the necessary corrections. "Official" registration for a course that a student does not attend could result in course overload and "F" grades and loss of funding. Lack of registration for a course can result in a student's not being allowed to attend class and in receiving no credit for the course.

E. Adding and Dropping Course

During the first six days of class (not including holidays or weekends), students have the opportunity to change a schedule. This process is initiated by the student in the college offering the course, with the written approval of the graduate coordinator.

Changes in a course schedule through this process are not reflected on a studentÝs quarterly grade report or permanent record. Following the six-day add/drop period, students must officially withdraw from a course and receive a "W" grade. This grade will be reflected on a grade report and permanent record. Withdrawal from a course during the first year, which results in carrying less than 14 credits (Ph.D.), or 16 credits (M.S.), full-time status, may result in loss of funding.

F. Withdrawal from a Course

Course withdrawal is the process a student follows when wishing to leave a class following the end of the first six days of the quarter. Course Withdrawal forms are available from the records office. In addition to the student's signature, the form requires the signature of the faculty member teaching the course and that of the Graduate Coordinator. A course withdrawal, resulting in a "W" grade, may be obtained through the end of the eighth week of the quarter only. Following that date, withdrawal forms must be signed by the Director of the Center and accompanied by a rationale that indicates circumstances beyond the student's control.

II. Course Work Policies

A. Repeating Courses

Graduate courses cannot be repeated to improve a grade.

B. Credit by Examination

Students with undergraduate degrees in Imaging Science can request credit by examination for the 1051-711 and 1051-712 courses. Such credit is usually not granted for any other courses.

Credit for curriculum courses may occasionally be granted by examination in the event that the student petitions an instructor to administer the exam. A Credit by Examination form must be completed and filed with the bursar (with $50 per credit hour fee) prior to taking the exam. The exam is pass/fail. The notation on a student's permanent record is (examination) credit only and does not affect the RIT grade point average.

C. Course Exemption

An instructor may recommend approval of a course requirement exemption based upon previous experience or course work. However, this exemption does not alter the total credit requirement for the degree program. Requests for course exemption must be initiated by the student, in writing to the Graduate Coordinator. Approval of the request is subject to graduate faculty consensus.

D. Course Substitution and Non-Imaging Science Electives

Permission to substitute required curriculum courses or to take courses from other departments for elective credit must be granted by the Graduate Coordinator. To initiate a request of this nature, the student must provide his or her faculty advisor with a description of the desired course. A written rationale which describes the importance of a desired non-imaging science elective in terms of career goals and curriculum specializations may be necessary. The student must also submit a full study plan, indicating all courses to be taken to satisfy the degree requirements. Approvals for substitutions of required courses are normally subject to graduate faculty consensus. A maximum of 8 credits may be taken outside the Center for the M.S. program.

E. Attendance

No record of attendance is kept by the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science administrative offices. Reports of absences are not required. However, a record of absences may be kept by any faculty member and may be used by that faculty member to determine a grade. Non attendance does not constitute withdrawing from a class, therefore in order to avoid an "F" grade, an official withdrawal is required.

F. Expulsion of Students from Class

A faculty member may, with good cause, expel a student from class for not more than one class session. If the faculty member wishes to exclude the student for a longer period, a recommendation must be made in writing, with documentation, to the Director of CIS. The student may appeal this decision to the Academic Grievance Committee of the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science. Final appeals are made to the Institute Hearing and Appeals Board.

Degree Requirements

Master of Science Degree

The Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science offers a Master of Science Degree in Imaging Science with a minimum of 45 quarter credit hours in graduate level work. A detailed outline of this degree program and its requirements is found on the following pages.

A second program by which one can earn a Master of Science Degree from the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science is Color Science. Forty-five quarter credit hours of graduate level work are required. Details regarding this degree can be obtained from Dr. Roy Berns, Coordinator of the degree program.

Ph.D. Degree

The Doctoral Degree program in Imaging Science can be pursued from either the baccalaureate or M.S. level. Curriculum details are included on the following pages.

For all graduate degrees, successful completion of all course work and thesis is required within seven years of the time of initial registration for graduate study. For the doctoral degree, the initiation of the seven year time period occurs when the student has the first opportunity to take the comprehensive exam. In rare cases, extensions of the seven-year rule may be granted. Certification requires a minimum program cumulative grade point average of 3.00 (a B average). Full payment or satisfactory adjustment of all financial obligations is required.

Responsibility for Degree Requirements

It is the student's responsibility to understand the requirements of the Imaging Science degree program. Progress toward achievement of a degree is maintained by the department records office. Access to that information is available to each student upon request to either his or her faculty advisor or to the Academic Coordinator. All degree requirements are published yearly in the RIT catalog. A copy of the graduate curriculum is included in this publication to be used as a reference. Alterations in an individual student's requirements (course substitutions, transfer credit, requirement waivers, credit by examination) must receive prior approval in writing as previously outlined. Questions regarding changes made in the curriculum during a student's program of study with the Center for Imaging Science should be directed to the Graduate Coordinator.

It is the student's responsibility to meet the requirements of the degree program and to remain informed of the progress towards that goal.

Academic Requirements

Master of Science in Imaging Science

1. Admission Requirements

Baccalaureate degree in science or engineering, including at least:

Mathematics through calculus, differential equations, and complex variables

One-year of calculus based college level physics with laboratory

One-year college level course in chemistry with laboratory

Evidence of professional promise in the form of previous high academic achievement and two letters of recommendation are expected. Applicants are required to take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE); those whose native language is not English must achieve a TOEFL score of 575 or better. International student applicants seeking funding should obtain a TOEFL score of 600 or better.

2. Program Summary

Required core sequence:

Basic Principles of Imaging Science I, II (1051-711, 1051-712)

Linear Image Mathematics I, II (1051-716, 1051-717)

Elective Sequence:

24 credit hours of electives

Project/Paper Options

4 credit hour Systems Course

1 credit hour Paper/Project

Students who choose a research thesis option must complete nine credit hours of research as a capstone (20 credit hours of electives). Included in the nine research hours is the course sequence 1051-706, 707, 708 Imaging Science Seminar.

Total of 45 credit hours (including thesis)

Master of Science in Imaging Science Project/Paper Program

Dr. Harvey E. Rhody
Coordinator, MS Program
Tel: 585/475-6215

The objective of this program is to prepare students holding a baccalaureate degree in science or engineering for positions in research and development, in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Formal course work includes: consideration of physics and chemistry of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, applications of physical and geometrical optics to electro-optical imaging systems, mathematical evaluation of image forming systems. In addition, a variety of technical electives at the graduate level may be selected from the courses offered in imaging science, color science, engineering, science and mathematics.

Faculty within the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science are engaged in active research in the chemistry and physics of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, digital image processing, remote sensing, electro-optical instrumentation, medical diagnostic imaging, chemical imaging, and astronomy. In addition, research opportunities are available in aspects of color in the Munsell Color Science Laboratory within the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science. Other interdisciplinary efforts are possible within the colleges of Engineering and Science.

The degree requirements can be completed either on a full or a part-time basis.

1. The Program

Imaging Science studies are available as a full-time or part-time master's degree program. All students must earn 45 credits as a graduate student, 37 of which must be taken at RIT to earn the Master of Science degree.

For full-time students, the program requires from three to six quarters of study at the graduate level. Students who choose a research thesis option normally take six (or more) quarters to complete; whereas students who chose a graduate project option normally complete in three quarters.

Part-time students normally require six quarters to complete the graduate project option, and twelve ( or more) quarters to complete a research thesis option.

2. The Curriculum

The curriculum is a combination of required, core courses in imaging science, and elective courses appropriate for the candidate's background and interests. Six tracks (concentrations) have been established: Digital Image Processing, Medical Imaging, Electro-Optical Imaging Systems, Remote Sensing, Color Imaging, and Hard Copy Materials and Processes. Additional tracks may be created for interested students. Students must enroll in either the research-thesis or graduate paper/project option at the beginning of their studies. Candidates who wish to enter the program but lack adequate preparation may have to take bridge courses in mathematics, chemistry, or physics before matriculating with graduate status.

3. Imaging Science Core Courses

All graduate students in the M. S. Imaging Science program are required to complete the following core courses:

1051-711,712 Basic Principles of Imaging Science I & II

1051-716,717 Linear Image Mathematics I & II

4. Imaging Science Elective Tracks

Graduate students are required to choose from one of the following six tracks (concentrations):

1. Digital Imaging Track

2. Color Imaging Track

3. Remote Sensing Track

4. Hard Copy Materials & Processes Track

5. Medical Imaging Track

6. Electro-Optical Imaging Systems Track

(Track requirements are listed below)

5. Research Thesis Option

Full-time students who elect this option begin their thesis work during the first year of study. Part-time students may defer the beginning of their thesis work until their second or subsequent years. Full-time students receiving funding assistance are required to choose the research thesis option.

6. Graduate Paper/Project Option

Students with research experience may choose the graduate project option (5 Cr. Hr.). This option takes the form of a Systems Course (a different course for each track) and an associated project /paper. The graduate paper is normally performed during the final quarter of study. Both part-time and full-time students may choose this option (1051-840).

7. Scheduling

Some courses are offered in the evening for the benefit of part-time students. Information concerning these courses may be obtained from the Coordinator, M.S. Graduate Program. If a student is employed full-time, release time from work is essential to meet degree requirements.

8. Admission

Admission to full-time or part-time programs will be granted to graduates of accredited degree-granting institutions whose undergraduate studies have included at least the following courses in major areas of study: mathematics including one year of university calculus, differential equations, and linear algebra and a knowledge of complex variables; a full-year university-level (i.e. calculus based) course in physics with laboratory, and one course in modern physics; a full-year college-level course in chemistry with laboratory; and an introduction to organic chemistry. It is assumed that students can write simple computer programs, and have experience with a high level language such as Fortran or C. A course in quantum physics is recommended, though not required. Some knowledge of probability and statistics is desirable.

Applicants must demonstrate to the Graduate Admissions Committee of the Center for Imaging Science that they have the capability to pursue graduate work successfully. Normally this may include an interview, the submission of a statement of purpose, presentation of the undergraduate academic record, letters of evaluation from individuals familiar with the applicant's capabilities, and any other pertinent data furnished by the applicant. While previous high academic achievement does not guarantee admission, such achievement or other unusually persuasive evidence of professional promise is expected.

Applicants are also required to take the GRE. Students whose native language is not English must demonstrate proficiency in English, as evidenced, for example, by a TOEFL score of 575 or higher. Students whose native language is not English must obtain a TOEFL score greater than 600 if they wish to apply for a teaching or research assistantship. These candidates are also required to take the TSE-A. (test of spoken English,) in order to be considered for financial assistantship.

9. Funding

Funding is restricted to students who choose the research thesis option and are full-time students. These students typically are funded as Graduate Teaching Assistants during their first year. Graduate Research Assistantships may be available during the second year.

These assistantships are funded at $10,000 for three academic quarters. Funding during the Summer quarter may be obtained from grants and/or contracts obtained by individual faculty. Tuition is also paid for full-time funded students. Funding is guaranteed only for the first year. A small number of partial scholarships are available. These only cover a portion of the tuition costs. Students accepting these scholarships are required to pay the remaining tuition costs each quarter, as well as all living expenses from their own funds.

10. Thesis

The thesis is to be based on experimental evidence obtained by the candidate in an appropriate field as arranged between the candidate and his or her adviser. The minimum number of thesis credits required is nine. The thesis requirement may be fulfilled by experiments in Institute laboratories. In some cases, the requirement may be fulfilled by work done in other laboratories. An example might be the candidate's place of employment, under the following conditions:

1. The results must be fully publishable.

2. The candidate shall have an adviser approved by the graduate coordinator.

3. The thesis must be based on the candidate's independent and original work, as it would be if the work were done in Institute laboratories. The work shall not have started prior to the assignment of the adviser.

11. Grades

The average of the grades for all courses taken at the Institute and credited toward a master's degree must be at least a "B" (3.0) grade point average. Research and Thesis does not carry a letter grade and is not included in the average.

Example Tracks

Digital Imaging Track

Core Courses:

1051-716, 717 Linear Image Mathematics I, II 8 Credits

1051-711,712 Basic Prin. of Imaging Science I & II 8 Credits

Total Core Credit Hours 16 Credits

Required Courses: 24 Credits

1051-782 Intro to Digital Image Processing 4 Credits

1051-784 DIP: Spatial Pattern Recognition 4 Credits

1051-792 Image Understanding 4 Credits

0303-715 Statistical Analyses for Engineering I, 4 Credits

or equivalent

Choose Two Courses From Below 8 Credits

0301-749 Speech & Image Compression 4 Credits

0301-768 Adaptive Signal Processing 4 Credits

1051-744 Random Image Modeling 4 Credits

Systems Course & Project

1051-713 Noise & Random Processes 4 Credits

1051-840 Imaging Science M.S. Project 1 Credits

Total Credits Required 45 Credits

Thesis Option: Nine (9) credits of thesis preparation and research including 1051-706, 707, 708 Imaging Science Seminar (3 credits) and 1051-890 Research and Thesis (6 credits). Thesis & Research are taken in place of the M.S. project and eight (8) hours of systems or elective courses. The student must write & defend a Master's level thesis.




Color Imaging Track

Core Courses

1051-716, 717 Linear Image Mathematics I, II 8 Credits

1051-711, 712 Basic Prin. of Imaging Science I, II 8 Credits

Total Core Credit Hours 16 Credits

Required Courses: 24 Credits

1051-774 Vision 4 Credits

1051-775 Applied Colorimetry 4 Credits

1051-749 Color Reproduction 4 Credits

1051-776 Color Modeling 4 Credits

1051-726 Programming for Scientists and Engineers 4 Credits

Choose One Course From Below 4 Credits

1051-736, 737 Geometrical Optics, Physical Optics 4 Credits

1051-782 Digital Image Processing 4 Credits

0303-715 Statistical Analysis for Engineering I 4 Credits

1051-746 Statistics & Computation for Imaging Science 4 Credits

Systems Course & Project

1051-816 Color Systems 4 Credits

1051-840 Imaging Science M.S. Project 1 Credits

Total Credits Required 45 Credits

Thesis Option: Nine (9) credits of thesis preparation and research including 1051-706, 707, 708 Imaging Science Seminar (3 credits) and 1051-890 Research and Thesis (6 credits). Thesis & Research are taken in place of the M.S. project and eight (8) hours of systems or elective courses. The student must write & defend a Master's level thesis.






Remote Sensing Track

Core Courses

1051-716, 717 Linear Image Mathematics I, II 8 Credits

1051-711,712 Basic Principles of Imaging Science I, II 8 Credits

Total Core Credit Hours 16 Credits

Required Courses: 24 Credits

1051-761 Remote Sensing: Radiometric 4 Credits

1051-762 Remote Sensing: Image Data Analysis 4 Credits

1051-763 Remote Sensing: Multispectral 4 Credits

Choose Three Courses From Below

1051-782 Introduction to DIP 4 Credits

1051-784 DIP: Spatial Pattern Recognition 4 Credits.

1051-713 Noise & Random Processes 4 Credits

1051-736, 737, 739 Optics, Solid State Arrays 4 Credits

Systems Course & Project

1051-765 Remote Sensing Systems 4 Credits

1051-840 Imaging Science M.S. Project 1 Credits

Total Credits Required 45 Credits

Thesis Option: Nine (9) credits of thesis preparation and research including 1051-706, 707, 708 Imaging Science Seminar (3 credits) and 1051-890 Research and Thesis (6 credits). Thesis & Research are taken in place of the M.S. project and eight (8) hours of systems or elective courses. The student must write & defend a Master's level thesis.






Hard Copy Materials & Processes Track

Core Courses

1051-716, 717 Linear Image Mathematics I, II 8 Credits

1051-711, 712 Basic Prin. of Imaging Science I, II 8 Credits

Total Core Credit Hours 16 Credits

Required Courses: 24 Credits

1051-731 Principles of Chemical Imaging I 4 Credits

1051-732 Principles of Chemical Imaging II 4 Credits

1051-749 Color Reproduction 4 Credits

Choose One Course Sequence From Below 12 Credits

1051-771, 772, 773 Silver Halide I, II, III

1051-756, 757, 758 Electrophotography I, II, III

1051-774, 775, 776 Vision & Color

Systems Course & Project

1051-807 Hard Copy Systems 4 Credits

1051-840 Imaging Science M.S. Project 1 Credits

Total Credits Required 45 Credits

Thesis Option: Nine (9) credits of thesis preparation and research including 1051-706, 707, 708 Imaging Science Seminar (3 credits) and 1051-890 Research and Thesis (6 credits). Thesis & Research are taken in place of the M.S. project and eight (8) hours of systems or elective courses. The student must write & defend a Master's level thesis.






Medical Imaging Track

Core Courses

1051-716, 717 Linear Image Mathematics I, II 8 Credits

1051-711, 712 Basic Prin. of Imaging Science I, II 8 Credits

Total Core Credit Hours 16 Credits

Required Courses : 24 Credits

1010-730 MRI 4 Credits

1051-797 Prin. CT Imaging 4 Credits

1051-726 Programming for Scientists & Engineers 4 Credits

Choose Any Three Courses From Below 12 Credits

1051-782 Digital Image Processing 4 Credits

1051-784 Spatial Pattern Recognition 4 Credits

1051-713 Noise and Random Processes 4 Credits

1051-774 Vision 4 Credits

0301-768 Adapt. Sig. Proc. 4 Credits

Systems Course & Project

1051-812 Medical Imaging Systems 4 Credits

1051-840 Imaging Science M.S. Project 1 Credits

Total Credits Required 45 Credits

Thesis Option: Nine (9) credits of thesis preparation and research including 1051-706, 707, 708 Imaging Science Seminar (3 credits) and 1051-890 Research and Thesis (6 credits). Thesis & Research are taken in place of the M.S. project and eight (8) hours of systems or elective courses. The student must write & defend a Master's level thesis.




Electro-Optical Imaging Systems Track

Core Courses

1051-716, 717 Linear Image Mathematics I, II 8 Credits

1051-711, 712 Basic Prin. of Imaging Science I & II 8 Credits

Total Core Credit Hours 16 Credits

Required Courses: 24 Credits

1051-736 Geometrical Optics 4 Credits

1051-737 Physical Optics 4 Credits

1051-739 Solid State Imaging Arrays 4 Credits

Choose 12 Additional Credit Hours From Below 12 Credits

1051-779 Astronomical Instrumentation & Techniques 4 Credits

1051-782 Introduction to Digital Image Processing 4 Credits

1051-761, 762, 763 Remote Sensing Sequence 12 Credits

0301-776 Electro-Optics 4 Credits

0301-723 Semiconductor Physics 4 Credits

0301-724 Physics of Semiconductor Devices I 4 Credits

Systems Course & Project

1051-738 Optical Image Formation 4 Credits

1051-840 Imaging Science M.S. Project 1 Credits

Total Credits Required 45 Credits

Thesis Option: Nine (9) credits of thesis preparation and research including 1051-706, 707, 708 Imaging Science Seminar (3 credits) and 1051-890 Research and Thesis (6 credits). Thesis & Research are taken in place of the M.S. project and eight (8) hours of systems or elective courses. The student must write & defend a Master's level thesis.




Academic Requirements for the Ph.D. in Imaging Science

General Description of the Doctoral Program in Imaging Science

Purpose and goals: as widespread and prosperous as the imaging technologies currently are, there has been only limited effort to organize and extend the fundamental body of knowledge on which these technologies are based. This is in large part due to the limited number of individuals with a sound education in Imaging Science. There is a critical need for individuals with advanced training who can help define the fundamental principles and linkages on which the imaging technologies are built. In response to this requirement, RIT has initiated a Ph.D. program in Imaging Science.

The Ph.D. curriculum offers students a thorough course of study and research, structured and directed by experts in the field. Graduates of the program will contribute to an increase in the fundamental body of knowledge associated with Imaging Science. They will acquire the capabilities, skills, and experience to continue to expand the limits of the discipline, and to meet the scholarly, industrial, and government demands. A major thrust of the educational process will be the development of research skills.

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Imaging Science signifies high achievement in scholarship and independent investigation in the diverse aspects of Imaging Science. Candidates for the Ph.D. degree must demonstrate proficiency by:

1. Successfully completing coursework, including a core curriculum, and additional course work as defined by the student's plan of study,

2. Passing a series of examinations, and

3. Completing an acceptable dissertation under supervision of the student's research advisor and Dissertation Committee.

Curriculum: the course of study involves two years of course work beyond the baccalaureate and a research-based thesis. The curriculum includes a required course sequence to provide a fundamental understanding of the chemical, physical, electro-optical, biological, and mathematical undergirdings of Imaging Science. Also included in the core are treatments of stochastic processes and information theory as they impact imaging concepts and provide a common framework for describing and understanding various imaging systems. Elective courses permit concentration in electro-optical imaging, photo-chemical imaging, digital image processing, color science, perception and vision, electrophotography, lithography, remote sensing, medical diagnostic imaging, electronic printing, and machine vision.

Core Curriculum

The core curriculum includes courses that span and integrate a common body of knowledge essential to an understanding of imaging processes and applications. The core courses are required of all doctoral students unless a substitution or waiver is formally approved in the student's study plan. These substitutions can be made in certain cases on the basis of previous graduate course work.

The Core Courses

1051-706, 707, 708 Imaging Science Seminar

1051-711, 712 Basic Principles of Imaging Science I, II

1051-713 Noise and Random Processes

1051-714 Information Theory for Imaging Systems

1051-716, 717 Linear Image Mathematics I, II

1051-721, 722, 723, Imaging Laboratory I, II, III

1051-726 Programming for Scientists and Engineers

Course Requirements

All students must complete a minimum of 72 quarter credit hours of coursework beyond the baccalaureate degree. The actual number of credit hours and course content are defined by the student and the Dissertation Committee in the study plan, and must include completion of the core sequences plus at least two three-quarter sequences in topical areas. These topical areas include: silver-halide science, remote sensing, digital image processing, electrophotography, electro-optical imaging systems, medical imaging, color and psychophysics and microlithographic imaging technologies. Students may take a maximum of 16 quarter credits in other departments, although it should be noted that courses in other departments of the Institute may be cross-listed and thus apply as courses in Imaging Science. The student must also complete 27 quarter hours of research and seminar, with a maximum of 6 credits per quarter.

Requirements for Admission to the Ph.D. Program in Imaging Science

Because Imaging Science encompasses a wide variety of scientific disciplines, students with diverse backgrounds are accepted into the program. Undergraduate preparation leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering, computer science, applied mathematics, or one of the natural sciences is usually required, but exceptional students from other fields may be accepted. All students admitted to the Ph.D. program in Imaging Science must have completed courses in the following areas:

Calculus, Differential Equations, and Complex Variables

Probability and Statistics

Chemistry (one year)

University Physics (one year)

Modern Physics

Computer Language (e.g. FORTRAN, PASCAL, C)

Admissions decisions are made by a committee of the Graduate Faculty of the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science. To be admitted, students must have a record of academic achievement from their undergraduate institution as indicated by official transcripts, must demonstrate proficiency on the Graduate Record Examination, and must request letters of recommendation from two persons well qualified to judge their qualifications for graduate study. Students for whom English is not the native language must also submit the results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Professional and research experience are also considered in the decision to admit.

Due to the variety of backgrounds of incoming students, it is recognized that some students will not have the requisite preparation in all areas and will have to complete some undergraduate requirements during the course of their graduate study.

Students with a Master of Science degree in Imaging Science or a related field may be granted up to 36 quarter credits toward the Ph.D. degree in Imaging Science based on their earlier studies and after successful completion of the Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination. The number of credits counted toward the Ph.D. degree and any substitution for Imaging Science core or elective courses is determined through a process consisting of preparation, review, and approval of the student's study plan. The required research credits may not be waived by experience or examination.

Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination

All students in the doctoral-track must take and pass the comprehensive exams to continue in good standing beyond their first full academic year. The exams are intended to test a student's knowledge of the breadth of the field of Imaging Science at a graduate level and their ability to proceed to advanced course work. These exams must be successfully completed before a student can submit a dissertation proposal or attempt the candidacy exams. Typically, the exam should be taken after the first three quarters of study. Students who do not successfully pass the exams on the first attempt will be advised to consider an alternate course of study, however, they are permitted one additional attempt to pass the exams. The exams will typically be administered in the Spring and Summer quarter of each year.

All students who are full-time funded or unfunded students, and/or who have completed three quarters of full-time study, or who have been admitted on the basis of an MS degree in Imaging Science from RIT, will be required to take the Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination at the first opportunity.

Part-time doctoral students will be required to take the Ph.D. Comprehensive examination after completing two academic years of study, or completing 30 quarter credit hour of study.

The Exams

The examinations will consist of two parts. The first part is a general examination which will cover the core courses taken during the first year. The second part is a more specific examination, and each student selects one examination from a selection of 6 areas, including: Digital Imaging, Medical Imaging, Remote Sensing, Color Imaging, Hard-Copy Materials and Processes, and Electro-Optical Imaging. Each will be given on a separate day over an approximately 4 hour period. All exams are closed book and no programmable calculators will be permitted.

The exams will be graded by two or more members of the graduate faculty and final pass/fail status will be determined by the Ph.D. comprehensive Examination Committee and will be posted for each exam and filed with the student's permanent record.

Each student is required to pass both parts of the exam. If a student fails one part of the exam on the first attempt, he/she only has to retake the part failed and does not have to repeat both parts. The student may only sit for the comprehensive exams twice, and these attempts must be in successive examinations.

Reading lists are available each year to assist students in preparing for the exams. Contact the Ph.D. Coordinator to obtain copies of the reading lists. Students who fail the Ph.D. Comprehensive Exam may be qualified to receive an M.S. degree.

Dissertation Advisor

By the time that students have successfully passed the Ph.D. comprehensive examination, all students should have selected and been accepted by a dissertation advisor. The advisor must be a member of the Graduate or Extended Graduate Faculty of the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science.

Dissertation Committee

After the student passes the comprehensive examination, and upon recommendation of the Director of the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, a Dissertation Committee of four members is appointed for the duration of the student's tenure in the program. One is appointed by the Dean, College of Science from the Faculty of another College within the Institute, and acts as the Chair of the final dissertation defense. The committee must also include the student's research advisor and at least one other member of the Graduate Faculty of the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science. The fourth member may be affiliated with industry or another institution. Persons who are not members of the Graduate Faculty of the Center must be approved by the Coordinator of the Doctoral program.

The duties of the Dissertation Committee include:

1. Reviewing and approving the study plan and dissertation proposal,

2. Preparing and administering the examination for admission to candidacy,

3. Assisting in planning and coordinating the research,

4. Monitoring the research and the preparation of the dissertation, and

5. Conducting the final examination of the dissertation.

Study Plan

The student and the dissertation advisor develop a study plan that defines the course work to be completed, including the technical electives most relevant to the student's field of interest. The study plan must be filed with the Doctoral Coordinator of the Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science and must be approved by the Dissertation Committee. The plan may be amended if the changes are approved by the Dissertation Committee. This is a critical document for the student because it represents the personal course of study required for that student. It documents how all requirements for course work will be met and defines the number of credit hours required for the individual student and how those credits must be obtained. A sample study plan is attached. No more than 4 credit hours of Research & Thesis may be taken prior to filing the Study Plan with the Ph.D. Coordinator.

Research Proposal

The student and the research advisor select a research topic for the dissertation. The proposed research must be original and publishable. Although the topic may deal with any aspect of imaging, the research is usually concentrated in an area of current interest within the Center.

The student must make a formal proposal of the dissertation topic to the Dissertation Committee for approval.

Admission to Candidacy

As soon as possible after acceptance of the Dissertation Proposal, but not later than six months prior to defending the dissertation, the student must pass an examination to be admitted to candidacy for the Doctoral degree. The examination is prepared and administered by the Dissertation Committee and may have oral and/or written sections at the committee's option. A typical examination may consist of oral responses to previously assigned written questions. The exam is intended to insure that the student is ready to actively pursue the proposed research. If the committee feels the student is ill-prepared, additional course work or preparation may be required or an alternative thesis direction required.

Residency

All students in the program must spend at least three consecutive quarters (summer quarter may be excluded) as resident full-time students to be eligible to receive the Ph.D. For residency purposes, a full-time academic load is defined as a minimum of 9 academic credits per quarter.

Time Limitations

All candidates for the Ph.D. must maintain continuous enrollment during the research phase of the program. This means that the student must register for at least 1 credit hour in each quarter (0 credit hour in Summer) until the thesis is successfully defended. Such enrollment is not limited to the 27 research credits which apply to the degree. Normally, full-time students complete the course of study for the Doctorate in approximately three to four years. A total of seven years is allowed to complete the requirements after the first attempt to pass the Ph.D. comprehensive examination

Final Examination of the Dissertation

The Dissertation Advisor must submit a letter to the Dean, College of Science requesting permission to administer the final examination of the dissertation. The letter must indicate that each member of the Dissertation Committee has received the dissertation and concurs with the request. The examination is scheduled by the Associate Provost, but may not be held sooner than two weeks after permission has been granted. The student is responsible for insuring that an announcement of the time, location, and content of the defense be publicly posted for at least two weeks prior to the defense.

The final examination of the dissertation is open to the public, and is primarily a defense of the dissertation research. The examination consists of an oral presentation by the student, followed by questions from the audience. The Dissertation Committee may also elect to question the candidate in private following the presentation. The Dissertation Committee will immediately notify the candidate and the Dean, College of Science of the result of the examination. Students who fail cannot attempt to pass the dissertation defense a second time, but they may be considered for the Masters Program.

Study Plan

The study plan represents the student's intended course of study. It is in essence the contract between the student and the Center regarding what courses are required. It becomes official only after three graduate faculty members, including the student's expected dissertation advisor, have signed indicating their approval, and the Ph.D. Coordinator has reviewed the study plan to confirm that all regulations will be adequately met by the plan.

The plan can be amended by the student through submission of a fully-completed modified form signed by three members of the graduate faculty and approved by the Ph.D. Coordinator. Once approved, the plan will only be amended by the faculty if poor performance by the student on the Candidacy exams indicates that additional course work is required to prepare the student for the proposed research. If this occurs, the student and the doctoral coordinator will be notified in writing by the committee administering the Candidacy exam of any required amendments. In the event a course in the study plan is no longer offered, it is the student's responsibility to file an amended study plan making substitutions approved by the committee.

Student Name

SS#

Approved by Dissertation Advisor

Committee Members
#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

Committee Member assigned by Dean

College of Science (Signature not required)

The study plan attached has been approved and filed with the student's permanent record.

Ph.D. Coordinator




Download the Ph.D. Study Plan
NOTE:This is a pdf document. You must have Adobe Acrobat Reader, available free from Adobe.

Explanation of Study Plan Footnotes

▄ should not exceed 16 hours

▄▄ should not exceed 36 hours (total of these 2 (▄ and ▄▄) items should not exceed 36 hours)

* must exceed 72 hours. Note that 72 hours is a minimum; based on a student's preparation and course of study the committee will often require a study plan that exceeds 72 hours.

** 3 quarters of the seminar course are required

*** 27 hours of research are required, including the seminar course, so this number must be 24 or larger

L should be placed in front of credit hours for non-1051 courses taken toward the degree after admission to the Imaging Science Program

M Credit hours for course credits being counted for the degree based on previous course work (i.e. before matriculation), or in rare cases based on previous experience, should be listed in the last column under M.



Part 2